What can we do to get more durability or life for EGO batteries ?

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How do we charge the batteries, should we plug it in all the time when not in use , how about winter time ? What can we do to get more durability or life for EGO batteries ?
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Mathew

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Posted 2 months ago

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Ken, Champion

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Official Response
Same as with any lithium-ion battery: Don't leave it on the charger 24/7, don't store it fully charged or fully depleted. 40-70 percent is a decent range. Charge it shortly before you use it (maybe the night before). Use the standard charger when possible.
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Mathew

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Mine came with a rapid charger, should I get a standard charge just to be in safe ?
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Mathew

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I bough the lawnmower with battery (7.5) and rapid charger and bought leaf blower, trimmer, hedger etc... bare tool but I think 7.5amp battery will be too heavy to use with other tools, what’s your advice ?
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Oregon Mike, Champion

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I like the 2.5 ah batteries for the handheld tools like trimmer, hedge trimmer, and blower. I don't have a 7.5 ah battery but do find my 5 ah batteries good for the mower (natch!), cultivator, and edger.
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Matthew

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Mine came with rapid charger as well
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Ken, Champion

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I wouldn't buy another charger just for this. You'll be fine. It's just something to consider if you buy additional Ego tools down the road and you get a standard charger with one of them.

Ego's chargers have fans in them that pulls air through the battery to cool them during charging. That helps protect the battery during rapid charging.
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Bryan

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Welcome to the land of multiple opinions! In the old days, fast chargers were a concern for fear of overcharging and you had to watch them like a hawk. That's old school thinking now. I don't think you'll ever have tow worry about overcharging with EGO's rapid charger as the "watching" is done electronically. You're fine using your rapid charger.

In general, the main thing is to avoid heat and a long-term full charge on your lithium batteries. While some batteries will discharge on their own after so many days of storage (EGO batteries do here so you're safe here too), others you may need to discharge to a lower level manually if you have no plans to use the battery in the near future. I’ve seen some recommendations that for long-term storage a charge level of 30-60% is recommended, but some manufactures have suggested a charge level of 80% (not EGO) is acceptable for long-term storage of your lithium batteries.

An article with some links and embedded video if you want to get into the nitty gritty: https://poweredbybattery.com/electrek-are-you-killing-your-lithium-batteries/
(Edited)
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Matthew

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So keeping it on the charger for an hour letting it get fully green and then taking it off is ok. I charge it in the house and keep the battery in the house as well to keep extreme temps from being a factor
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William E Hanson

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Matthew, yes. Mine are kept year round in my garage; the temps aren't extreme since it's well insulated mid 40s-80s. Have not had any battery issues.
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Ken, Champion

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Bryan, my comments about the rapid charger had nothing to do with concerns about overcharging. Its more to do with heat.
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Bryan

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Ken, given the amount of fans in the charger and airflow designed in both the EGO batteries and rapid charger....I'm not worried about the heat via the rapid charger either. I think EGO designed their products well enough here so as long as you're not charging in an already over-heated environment you're good. Again though, plenty of room for a difference of opinion.
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Ken, Champion

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Bryan, as I wrote above: "Ego's chargers have fans in them that pulls air through the battery to cool them during charging. That helps protect the battery during rapid charging."
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Ted Vigodsky

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This is the same way I treat my Nissan Leaf lithium ion battery. Gentle as she goes.
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William E Hanson

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It's easy for me since mine are in use year round; recharge once depleted and placed on the shelf in rotation. These batteries hold its charge for a long time and are smart to discharge partially when it sense lack of use, so stored over Winter, be mindful to recharge day before anticipated use.
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Matthew

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Yea I think I’ll get the snow blower so I will be able to do the same. Then the trimmer and blower and last the chain saw. Got a lot of experience to pay or would get all that done now. New house, car, furniture, and just got back from Philippines so after I pay some furniture off will start acquiring more equipment.
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William E Hanson

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Matthew, I remember when I was young needing everything and wanting it all at once. Best wishes.
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Prairiedog

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Umm, why is the official response contradicting the manual? I understood they are not the same as regular lithium batteries, they have built in power management circuits. So I'm confused. Ego says you do not need to do anything special, the battery will automatically go into long term storage mode after 30 days and maintain that state if left on the charger. Their instructions say to ensure long life, store the batts in a dry place and don't expose to extreme temps. A hot garage (basically keeping it in a state of overheating) will be more damaging than sitting on the charger in long term storage mode. If the above is really the case, then Ego needs to revise their manual. On the other hand, following it for three years, we have not seen any decrease in power or performance using tools year round.
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Ken, Champion

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My opinion is my own, but it comes from years of experience dealing with lithium batteries. There's what manufacturers recommend to get perfectly satisfactory results, then there are best practices if you really want to baby your batteries to get the absolute most out of them.

It's a balance between ease of use for the average consumer and going the extra mile to maximize life.
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Prairiedog

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That may be for run of the mill lithiums that get memory burned in, shortening charges. but these are *not* normal batteries, they have advanced tech to prevent that, assuming you are following the manual for the batteries. So your advice could be circumventing or defeating the very safeguards Ego programmed in. I'm just saying this so everyone is aware you are extrapolating this advice from older technology problems that Ego supposedly addressed with their system.
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Ken, Champion

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Memory has never really been a problem with lithium-ion batteries. That was more of an issue with NiCads.

And nothing is being "circumvented" or "defeated" by my advice.

Ego's batteries begin to self-discharge after a month of disuse, even if they're on the charger. That's fine for long-term storage (over the winter, for example). And most people can follow the manual and never have a problem.

But smart technology or not, lithium cells don't like to be stored fully charged or fully depleted for very long. Depending on how often you cycle through batteries it may never be an issue. But if you only use your battery once a week, storing it at 100 percent isn't great for the long-term health of the cells. Ego batteries do shut down before they're completely depleted, so that's less of a concern.

For someone who wants to get the very most out of the cells in their batteries, storing them at a slightly reduced state of charge is the way to go. At the very least, absolutely no harm will come from following this advice. None.

Tesla makes state-of-the-art lithium-ion batteries. Teslas charge to 90 percent capacity by default. You have to manually set the charger to get them to charge to 100 percent.

There's a reason Tesla can give their $15,000 battery packs eight-year warranties.

https://batteryuniversity.com/learn/article/how_to_prolong_lithium_based_batteries

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William E Hanson

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Owners Manuals isn't suppose to cover every possible scenario and expect each user to use their common sense such as not throwing it around, leaving it out in the rain, etc. They provide general guidelines to give us a benchmark.
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Prairiedog

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Can you point to an Ego paper that says short term, say weekly storage at 100% is harmful for their batteries? That is what I am concerned about. My point is you are using assumptions from batteries that are not Ego, and which don't have the tech. You haven't offered any "proof" your method would prevent deterioration in Ego batteries. But you also haven't demonstrated it is a problem with Ego in the first place. I have used and stored mine for three years, most often on the charger, and all mine still run as long as the day I brought them home. So I would guess if it was going to be a serious issue I'd have seen it by now. So real world experience vs speculation based on other brands is the crux of the argument here.
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Matthew

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Yea I thought it said in the manual it was ok to leave it on the charger
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Ken, Champion

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Lithium cells are lithium cells. Ego batteries use Samsung lithium cells. Ego incorporates some excellent thermal management. Beyond that, they just have a self-discharge feature after a month. There's no magical electronics in the batteries.

Is it OK to leave the batteries on the charger? Sure. Is it the best thing for the longevity of the battery? Probably not.

No one said there is, to use your words, a "problem" or "serious issue." All Mathew asked was for tips to increase durability or extend the life of the batteries. I offered some best practices, which is backed up by the link I provided.

You seem to be spoiling for a fight I'm not interested in having. Does everything have to be a battle? Treat your batteries however you'd like. Maybe they'll last you five years, maybe they'll last you for 10. But nothing I've suggested will hurt a thing and it costs nothing for anyone who wants to try it.
(Edited)
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Matthew

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It have ADD so I put it in the charger and forget about it. It would be to hard for me to remember or pay attention to take it off before 100%. If you mow twice a week would that be ok to store at 100%?
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William E Hanson

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Matthew, use technology to remember for you. I use the heck out of my smartphone calendar app or an alarm clock app for time alert tasks.
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Matthew

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How long on the rapid charger do I set it for?
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William E Hanson

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Depending upon your battery Ah; set for an hour and the largest will be done.
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Matthew

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It takes less than an hour for me like 45 minutes. It’s 7.5ah 56v what comes with the SP Mower
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William E Hanson

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True and it doesn't hurt the battery if you take it off of the charger after an hour.
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William E Hanson

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Mathew, I have 2 rapid chargers and a standard; both gets the job done and I've seen no difference with performance of any of my batteries from 2.5 Ah through 7.5 Ah. If you only have 1 battery, what you should do is buy a tool as a kit to acquire another battery. It will come in handy. I have 5 batteries that I rotate except the 7.5 Ah that I use in either the SP Mower or Snow Blower. Handheld tools, I use 2.5 or 5.0 Ah.
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Mathew

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Thanks you folks . Any advice or guidance for regular maintenance? Manual says to clean the mower after each use , any tips on how to clean them ?
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William E Hanson

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Mathew. no sharp edge tools that may scratch the surface. I simply stand it up and blow it off with my EGO blower. There are universal scrapers made to clean mowers without damage; select one with rounded edges. Amazon search for "mower scraper".
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I'm probably going to be the outlier here. My batteries live in my unheated and uninsulated garage. So, they probably see upper 30 to low 40 in the winter (no liquids in the garage have ever frozen) and 90+ in the summer. I'm pretty casual about the whole charging thing too. I keep 2 in use until they need charging. I also keep 2 that are charged that then get put into use while the others are charging. Note that I don't leave them on the charger, although the battery manual says it's ok to do so. So they just sort of rotate like that. 2 in use and 2 charged. I do always run them to red so they get a full charge every time. My first batteries, a 5 ah and a 2.5 ah are in their 4th season of use and showing no signs of slowing down (I know, I just jinxed it). 
I'm really relying on EGO's engineering to see how well these batteries hold up and for how long.
(Edited)
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William E Hanson

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Oregon Mike, good approach because most bought in to EGO and when you do, it's based on faith that the technology won't let you down and not having to baby it. The lengthy warranty tells me EGO also believes it they would be out of business.
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giggleherz .

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My 2011 I pad2 is used everyday when not in use it stays plugged in. So the IPad is almost a decade old and I can still run it down to forty percent and it still charges to one hundred contradicting everything I have read about lithium ion batteries.
 I treat my EGO battery's with kid gloves, in the summer they stay charged full and I store them under glass. In the winter same thing no freezing and no overheating. I anticipate ten years at full charge because all my Lithium Ion batteries from ten years ago are all still working at one hundred percent.
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szwoopp, Champion

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Although your ipad is fully charged (i.e. 100%) it is not the same 100% it was 10 years ago.
The latest ios for iphones will tell you that your 100% battery is actually xx% of its capacity when it was new. (My 4 year old iphone is 84% of its new battery condition when fully charged).
(Edited)
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William E Hanson

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Smartphones really aren't as smart as the EGO battery.
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Matthew

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That’s what I was thinking
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Ken, Champion

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I've had two friends who had to have their iPhone batteries replaced because of the scandal a year or two ago where Apple was throttling the phones' processors to hide that the batteries were losing capacity. That's why iOS now has the option to show battery health.

Of course people replace their smartphones and tablets often enough that overall battery life is less of a concern than it is for lawn tools. If I get three years out of my iPhone battery I'm happy. I'd like my Ego 7.5 Ah battery to last a lot longer than that.
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szwoopp, Champion

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I'm expecting 7-12 years from my Ego batteries, but I am not expecting 100% at year 7 to be the same as when it was new.
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William E Hanson

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Giggleherz, nice testimony. Lots of people probably have bad memories with Ni-Cad batteries; been there, done that with various brands.