Weeds in Bermuda and Centipede, any advice?

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I do ok with my research on handling weeds, but this year the cloves and other vine type weeds are really giving me a headache.  I am scared to put anything on the warm weather grass in its growing season.  If you have any advice for treating a lawn in the summer for weeds, without too much kill off of the grass, I'm all ears!

Thank you.

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SCDC, Champion

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  • Ready to torch the weeds

Posted 5 years ago

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Murf

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That's a tough one, I too battle weeds in my St Augustine.  Virginia Buttonweed. My nemesis.  (Used to be Nutsedge, but discovered Ortho Nutsedge killer and that stuff knocks out Nutsedge starting in two days. ). I have tried everything for VB.  The weed control for southern lawns you cannot but down if the temp is going to get above 980 or so as it will dmg the ST. Augustine as well.  The natualt crabgrass killer worked to kill the parts of VB it got onto but, the pieces under the thatch and the pods still  produce more VB. I have found best practice for VB is to get down on all fours and get each 'shoot' and follow it back to the tap root, and pull it from there, being careful not to strip off the seed pods.  After doing that a few weeks in a row, I have stopped VB pretty much for good.    I think best bet is hand pulling, even though it sucks.   Weed free zone also works great but again, can't put it down if the temp is going to go above 90. (Labels say 95, but I have found that to be not true)
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SCDC, Champion

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I've tried the nutsedge killer and it worked out pretty good.  The earlier I apply it in the spring, the better my results.  But over all I have given up battling the weeds a that aren't broad leaf or don't blend in well.  Also, I kill off any clover.  Over all from a standing distance the yard looks really good, as long as I keep them under fair control.  I'm hoping for better chemicals in the near future.  It's getting better.  I've found the results you've found are identical to my experiences.  Thank you!
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Murf

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My pleasure.  I was going to try going organic with my lawn care as a a well balanced lawn with the right amount og organics in it will not even allow weeds to grow(they prefer crummy soil as opposed to healthy soil)  but that route takes a long time to get the right levels and it is considerably more expensive.  I also started using  Barricade as a pre-emergent in the early spring and late fall to help prevent any new weeds from coming in.   Just have to make sure you use enough it (at first I was using only half the recc. amount doh! and was not seeing any results)

Oh and I found the nutsedge works all through the hottest parts of our Huston summers and does no damage at all to the surrounding St Augustine.  I tried to apply it a day or so after mowing so the chemicals have a full week to get down to the root patch under the soil and kill it all off.
(Edited)
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BT

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Arizona lawns also use Bermuda in the summer and an overseeded fescue or rye in the winter.  Treating weeds like nutsedge is a royal pain, since the Bermuda and the summer heat make it prime for growing weeds but bad for weed control.  I don't like burning out my lawn trying to do weed control, and I often get a nice crop of nutsedge and spurge right about the time that it starts to warm up or cool off - right around seeding time.

I have had pretty good luck with the following formula in AZ.  Whatever weed grows in the summer I view as something to kill the seeds rather than the plant itself.  When the weather is cooler and the grass is established, I hit it with everything I can.  In the late summer, I use a half-dose of 2,4-D with a half-dose of Dicamba as soon as the weather turns cool enough to treat the grass (under 95 in the day and under 80 at night).  I spray the lawn at dusk, water at sunrise, then repeat the treatment in a week.  If I don't get reasonable control, I repeat a third time about 2 weeks later.  And, as soon as the winter grass is taking hold in the late fall, I treat with a good liquid pre-emergent.  I repeat the pre-emergent in the early spring just as the weather starts to hit turbo-grow (around mid-March for us in Phoenix) but I use a granular combo "weed n feed" rather than the liquid - it seems to create less heat stress on the lawn.  Using this system I have been able to control 95% of the weeds over the course of 2 years or so.  It is a slower process but it works.

By knocking down the seeds in the spring and early fall I can keep the nutsedge and spurge to a minimum.  Anything that starts to emerge in the winter grass I can knock down with Dicamba or 2,4-D.  Using this method - kill the plants in the spring, fall, and winter and the seeds in the fall and spring - the first year was a little disappointing, but the following years have been great for weed control.  Weed control also means seed control - kill it before it can seed, and make sure to kill the seeds as they germinate.  Takes a while but I have turned my lawn from a disaster to the envy of the neighborhood in about 2 1/2 years.
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SCDC, Champion

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Hello BT,

I tend to attack the heck out of weeds during the winter since I do not over seed with rye or fescue.  So whatever comes out of the ground, is a weed.  I also use the spray and spreader type of pre-emergence.  All I have to say is that Clover and Nutsedge are tough tough tough.  Thank you for the tips and adding to my arsenal for weed control  :)