true battery life?

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Trying to weigh the true cost of ownership of the battery tools compared with gas.
My only objection is this concerning buy a system of tools, like with a lawnmower.
We have a Honda mower now and it is about 8 years old, no problems other than a new plug air filter and a new blade. Add in the cost of gas with about 20 or so uses a season. Not much cost like every wants you to believe on the battery band wagon.. 
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Craig Rogers

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Posted 7 months ago

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William E Hanson

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Craig, it may be hard to believe, but cost may not be the most important criteria for many to switch to battery.
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Craig Rogers

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I think I didn't make myself clear,, its the cost of buying new batteries.. I am thinking of getting the new 2, 5 AH battery lawnmower which is brushless. At $750 which I would be willing to swallow to buy, but lets say the batteries only last 3-4 years, then there is another $440 plus tax in cost for new batteries.. OUCH!
(Edited)
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Frank Woodbery

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Hi Clay - I've avoided the carburetor and storage issues entirely by simply using ethanol-free gasoline. See https://www.pure-gas.org/ . It should keep for over a year.
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Prairiedog

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That is not readily available everywhere.
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Frank Woodbery

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Undoubtedly true, not available everywhere for sure. I am fortunate that there are several places that have it near me. But if somebody does have availability near them it is well worth the premium over ordinary ethanol-laden hygroscopic gasoline.
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Craig Rogers

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I have to say that I have hd my honda mower for at least 8 years and never had a problem with the gas with it.. I have just started using Stabilizer 2 years ago because last year I put 1 1/2 old gas in my 18hp twin seal coating machine by mistake and it caused the intake valves to seize.. Had to buy a new engine.  Learned my lesson there.  Maybe some gas engines are more prone to problems? 
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Frank Woodbery

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Yikes! Tough way to learn.
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summetj

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As a data point, I bought a mower with a 7.5 AH battery that was manufactured in Dec 2014 according to the sticker on the battery.  (I bought it in April of 2017, not sure why that battery had sat on a shelf that long....).  I have used that battery from fully charged to the red light at least once a week (many times two or three times a week) for two years now.  (I have a big lawn in Florida where it almost never stops growing.)

In June 2018 I bought a 2nd 7.5 AH battery so that I could do two batteries worth of mowing at once (It was manufactured in May of 2018 according to the sticker).  When I test the two batteries against each other, the 2014 battery has about 80% of the capacity of the 2018 battery. (of course, I have only used it for 2 years, and the other 2 years it was presumably just sitting on a shelf somewhere...).

I'm not expecting the batteries to last more than about 5 years before they are significantly degraded (say, 50% of original capacity). It all depends upon if you need the full capacity of your original battery, or can get buy with only 50%. In my situation, I really need 2-3 batteries to fully mow my (large!) lawn in one go. [I cycle them through the fast charger while mowing.] So I'm staggering my 7.5 AH battery purchases so that I have one "new" one under warranty coverage all the time.

Extrapolating from my experience, if you only need 50% of the capacity of your original battery, you can probably only buy a new battery every 5 years.
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Prairiedog

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We left behind our riding mower for Ego. Between maintenance and gas for the rider and plow service, we had put in well more than two new sets of batteries in the last 10 years. Breaking down the cost difference by each mow/snowblow it is easily worth the paltry couple of dollars to not be messing around with oil and gas, changing spark plugs, winterizing, sending it off for tune-ups/repairs, getting a new battery every couple years because it froze before we had taken it out to store for the winter, mice chewing through the components, decks and wheels breaking, and the production that blade sharpening was, not to mention not having to transport stinky gas in the car or store it in the barn, or worse, running out of gas and having to get back in the car while you are trying to prep for a party. Not to mention waiting for the service to show up after a blizzard. We probably still wouldn't be plowed out this year, lol. I could go on. That little green button is a miracle as far as I am concerned.
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Simon

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In my experience, comparing gas to electric of two similar product can be an endless discussion and is, from what I have experienced, often not the right way and done for the right reason. Few years back, I bought a Chevy Volt. One could argue it can fulfill quite a bit of an electric car purpose... A guy at work said "wow, it's a great idea, I might want one too, but how does it compare in cost with an ICE car?". We put numbers down, like you did, to figure out the "payback" time against a somewhat comparable car, say a Chevy Cruise... and there is one, at some point. Based on his usage, I think it was like 8 years or so. He then said "Wow, this is way too long, there is no point in buying such car, it is too expensive". Two weeks after, he changed his current car for a $65k Mercedes. Bottom line, he wanted to talk himself into adopting EV technology and wanted to use money savings as argument, but clearly, his point was that money itself is not an issue but the car was just not at all what he wanted. Maybe comfort was not to his liking, maybe power was not to his liking, maybe styling, who knows... 

Overtime, I ended up not comparing my Volt to anything anymore, based solely on cost. I established that I like the car for it's quietness, ride handling, etc. Not cost saving. .. and obviously, I appreciate using electricity as source of energy over oil... 

All this to say that you should consider changing your mower because you want to, because you think electric is a different, valuable source of energy to produce work and because you like the EGO product above all. Don't try to convince yourself only on the money argument, it may never work... 

My advice is your Honda seems in good shape, Honda has terrific very reliable mowers, maybe you just don't need to change it. Stick to it until it breaks (if ever it does...) and then evaluate a new product based on your criteria/your liking in terms of cut quality, reliability, look, etc... 
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Blue Angel, Champion

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Well said!
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Craig Rogers

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Why I was considering the Lawn Mower with the 2 5AH batteries is because I need the string trimmer with the Multi Tool for work, and I also need the pole hedge trimmer for the my yard. So I thought of buying those tools with no batteries and then getting the lawn mower too which has the batteries and fast charger so I could save some money if I decided the mower was a good move.. 
Then I am thinking of getting the snow blower for next snow season if I do that.. 
However I am thrifty so I always look at things like that.

so if I don't get the Lawnmower I will get the Multi Tool with the trimmers..
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Prairiedog

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The mower is great, go for it. the full kits are always a better value, since you can't buy solo batts that cheap, especially when kits go on sale. Just sayin' one can never have too many batteries.
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William E Hanson

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True; I accumulated enough batteries not to worry about waiting for a charge.
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Andrew Danzig

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The idea of "cost" is complex and depends on many variables and also perspective. There's your out-of-pocket cost, life-cycle cost of production, maintenance and disposal, and environmental/societal costs associated with same. People tend to ask "pay back" questions only with something new or something they don't understand. When I'm asked what the pay back is on my solar pv system, I respond 15,000 lbs CO2, 4500 lbs NO3 and 3000 lbs SO3 not emitted to the atmosphere from burning coal at the nearby power plant. As noted in an earlier comment, the guy who spent $65k on a Mercedes wasn't considering pay back. It's not always about money; it's about choices we make for what kind of home and world we want to live in. My decision to switch from gas mower to battery was being tired of changing oil, burning gas and having to wear ear plugs while mowing. I'm in my 3rd season using the EGO Power 21" mower with 7.5 AH battery. The issue I have now that brought me to this community forum is decreasing battery charge. The first year, I averaged one hour per charge, last year 50 minutes, and this year 40 minutes. Fortunately it's still under warranty and EGO agreed to send me a new one. I learned that the SN and manufacturing dates on the battery and charger should match. The battery that was shipped with my mower and charger had a different SN and was 14 months older.
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William E Hanson

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Andrew, EGO is a large manufacturer and very possibly each component is actually made at various locations or vendors. Thus, mismatch dates on parts is common. It shouldn't be a concern knowing their liberal warranties.
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Andrew Danzig

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One would think. But the CS rep said the mismatched SNs raised a red flag with them and she had to get supervisor approval to issue me a [hopefully] new battery. I raised the issue here b/c another rep may use the dates as an excuse not to honor the warranty.