Temperature when storing batteries importance

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I have read on this great forum about battery temp storage. I seem to be seeing two different max temps. 85 and 104 degrees Fahrenheit. I am hoping to store  the batteries  in my garage over the summer and it most likely will be somewhere between these two temps but def not over 104. Is this ok?
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David

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Posted 11 months ago

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dhau001

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Be prepared to lose up to 35% of storage capacity permanently in a year at that temperature. 

Bottom line, store cool and never at 100%.  40% is ideal for storage.

To extend battery life, i suggest not charging after finishing with tools. Charge up the day you plan to use the tool.  Lithium batteries do not like being at 100%.

(Edited)
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Amber F., Official EGO Rep

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Official Response
Hi David! For best results, we recommend storing your battery pack where the temperature is below 80°F (26°C) and free of moisture. On the other hand, your battery should be charged in a location where the temperature is greater than 32°F (0° C) and less than 104°F (40° C).
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Gary Luethans

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Hi there.  I have a related question:  is it OK to keep the battery charger in the garage during the summer or should I bring that inside as well as the batteries?  I live in Phoenix so summer temps are well over 100 every day.  Thanks.  Gary
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szwoopp, Champion

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yes inside would be a better location for charging and storage due to the high temperature
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Ryan LaBarre

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Any issue with storing/charging in a heated garage (50 degrees F) during the winter???
Or summer, rarely gets above 75 in the same garage???

Also, Having to remember to plug in your batteries each time you want to use them is a massive PITA.  Please develop a system where the batteries can be stored at 80% which is usually fine.  Perhaps the charger has one setting for full, one for 80, so we could leave batteries on the charger at 80%.  Something other than this system please.

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Blue Angel, Champion

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50-75 is fine for storage and charging. If charging before use is not convenient, just charge the batteries after using them and they’ll be ready to go.

Ego’s chargers are pretty fast, so I usually just charge before use.
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Ryan LaBarre

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well this comment above scares me "ottom line, store cool and never at 100%.  40% is ideal for storage.

To extend battery life, i suggest not charging after finishing with tools. Charge up the day you plan to use the tool.  Lithium batteries do not like being at 100%.  "   Just wondering how bad it is to store them at 100%
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Blue Angel, Champion

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Ego doesn’t charge their cells as high as other companies do, which is likely their way of protecting against this issue. Check out this video, it shows Echo charging their cells to a higher voltage than Ego:

https://youtu.be/lRdBS9oFUXc

Ego has done a very impressive job of designing a durable and robust battery system.
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Ken, Champion

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A "massive PITA," really? A bigger PITA than making sure you remembered to go to the gas station to fill the gas can?

I tend to not return my batteries to the charger after use and charge them the night before I'm going to use them. It's just part of managing lithium batteries. It's the same for my camera equipment and drone batteries.

I love the fact that if I do forget to charge them in advance, the rapid charger can charge the 5.0 Ah battery in about 20 minutes from its partial charge.
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Ryan LaBarre

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Yeah, it is a PITA.  maybe not massive :)  I dont always mow at predictable times.. I have young kids.. A lot of times its "ok, kids are not bothering me, GO MOW MOW MOW"  or I just decide randomly its time to mow quick before a storm.  So yeah, charging day of or right before isnt very convenient at all.  Now if someone where to tell me instead of 5 years of life you may only get 4 by abusing them and keeping them on the charger, I would sacrifice that year for convenience.  If they said 5 years becomes 2 years, I would likely not haha.
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Ken, Champion

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Well, the batteries do have three-year warranties, if that helps you to decide to live life on the edge!
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brinox

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Also, Ego batteries self-discharge to ~35% after 30 days of no use, which also adds to their longevity.

In the summer, I almost always charge after using, because I will inevitably have to use them in a week or maybe two.  In the fall and winter, I charge them up after the last mow/leaf mulch and let the 30 day timer kick the battery back down to storage voltage automatically.  When its time to clear the snow off the driveway, I charge them up just prior to snowblowing so that they're warm enough to deliver the proper current.

My only complaint is there doesn't seem to be a way to manually initiate the self-discharge function...
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Ryan LaBarre

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brinox.. great info.. thank you.. didnt know they auto discharged... I tend to leave batteries on the charger full time, but ill try to remove them after they are done charging to start that timer.  thanks
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Blue Angel, Champion

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Ego batteries will self discharge after 30 days even if they’re sitting in the charger. The discharge circuit is in the battery and operates regardless of where the battery is located.

The charger will stop charging the battery once it’s done and doesn’t try to continually top it up. In fact, the battery needs to have significant use before the charger will attempt to charge it again. If you fully charge a battery and only use it for a few minutes, the charger will refuse to top it up. It needs a certain amount of discharge before the charger will start charging it again.
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Ryan LaBarre

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Thanks... so if i charge to full and leave it on the charger will it discharge after 30 days to 30% or whatever its low watermark is before kicking in to charge again? or will it drop to the level at which it would start charging again, say 80%?  just curious. thanks again guys.. very helpful
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Blue Angel, Champion

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It will drop to 30% and stay that way. If you want to charge, just pull it off and re-insert and it will charge back up.
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Ryan LaBarre

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Awesome.. thank you sir.
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Blue Angel, Champion

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Any time!