String Trimmer fell down - will the battery be OK?

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So, I used my new 15" split-shaft with rapid reload head over the weekend.  I propped the trimmer against the wall momentarily to move a trash bin.  I had the trimmer inverted, so the top of motor housing was resting on the driveway and the top of the battery attachment/arm rest area was against the wall.  Moments later, it began to slide and then fell to the driveway.  The arm rest got a bit scuffed and one of the rubber corners of the battery got a small scuff / nick.

I'm not concerned about the cosmetics, but more curious if the battery falling from that height is bad?  Is the battery housing strong enough to take the impact from a fall or do I have to worry that I've somehow damaged it internally?  Is there any chance it will stop working prematurely, or worse blow up on me during a charge or during usage?

I continued to use it without issue and even used it in my mower while the mower's battery charged, so I'm not seeing any operational issues at the present time.

I'm probably being paranoid, but figured I'd ask anyway.

Thanks.
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Vader2k

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Posted 1 year ago

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Blue Angel, Champion

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Barnaby, Ego's spokesman at trade shows, is famous for throwing batteries around to prove their durability. No need to worry... they're pretty tough. :-)
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TheAtomTwister

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Yeah, I've dropped my batteries plenty of times and they work well still.
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Amber F., Official EGO Rep

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Blue Angel is right. Unless you've noticed a change in performance, there should be no issue. 
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Vader2k

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Awesome, glad to hear.  Thanks for the replies!
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Oregon Mike, Champion

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I know Vader2k's question had to do with the battery, but I wonder about the latching mechanism, release mechanism, whatever circuitry is inside that "arm rest" area, the trigger and safety switches, and whatever else there may be at that end. 
It seems that adding up the weight of the battery and the rest of that end and falling from that distance, 5 ft or so, maybe?, something could be partially damaged and there could be an unforeseen problem in the near future? Meaning something could have been loosened, cracked, etc, that might be ok now but fail after some period of time. 
Not sure what type of drop tests have been performed by Ego on these tools but might be nice to know what else to watch for besides just the battery.
And, I get it that if it fails in the future, how would one really know if it was this fall or just wear and tear that caused it.
Anyway, just food for thought as these tools really are pretty rugged feeling and seem like they could hold up to quite a lot.
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Technically, future problems can be related to the fall. Whether or not they are covered under the warranty is another matter and they probably wouldn't be covered but that doesn't change that future problems could very well be related to the fall. I worked long enough in the electro-mechanical field (all my career) to know this for sure.
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szwoopp, Champion

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Mike I was not giving technical electro/mechanical advice.  Just common sense warranty claim advice.  I guess my post needed a wink emoji
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Blue Angel, Champion

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Mike, statistics would back up a claim that if a new tool was dropped and then survived the five year warranty period of normal use without incident, chances are pretty good it didn't suffer any terminal damage from the fall.

Not impossible, but very probable. ;-)
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Oregon Mike, Champion

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Blue Angel, agreed. My comment was to szwoopp's comment " any future problems would not be related to the fall". That comment was a  bit too sweeping a generalization (winking emoji, or not) and I was trying to indicate that I've seen delayed failures due to previous trauma. It had nothing to do with warranty and I even said it probably wouldn't be covered by warranty. Just that it is entirely possible that future problems could be related to the fall. Just trying to indicate to Vader2k that there could be. If nothing ever comes of the fall, that's great. And the way it should be in a well designed tool.
My favorite saying about statistics (note that I worked with statistics during the last 10 years of my career as a Process Engineer and Engineering Technician) is "You put one hand in boiling water, and one hand in ice cold water, statistically you are comfortable. Big Wink!
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Blue Angel, Champion

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LOL, I'm gonna remember that one! :-)