Self Propelled Snow Blower

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  • Updated 2 months ago
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I'm sure a lot of us would like a self-propelled snow blower.   I would like to do away with my gas snowblower, but I'm a 68 year old female and I absolutely need the self-propelled for the steep little hill on my driveway.   Also, it helps to get through what the street plows leave at the end of my driveway.   Will wait for self-propelled.  Please make one soon.   Love EGO products, but why didn't you release a self-propelled snow blower to start with.
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Joanne

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Posted 10 months ago

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Jacob, Champion

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I agree. No need to start out little anymore. Any new release better compete with the best of the best in my opinion. Sure the ego snow blower is cool and does actually kick butt. But why not make a final first release instead of this start from the beginning process. In my opinion it's just a copy of the other single stage blowers on the market.
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Blue Angel, Champion

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Except with “Peak Power” tecnology.

“Power Beyond Belief”. :-)
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szwoopp, Champion

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1) Less design time thus Quicker to market
2) Lower cost thus larger market
3) Already using two 7.5 batteries - not sure where you are going to get SP power from without diminishing run time.
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Chung Tong

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I am sure it is coming. It's just matter of time.
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Prairiedog

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On a similar thread recently the response was there was nothing on deck. I am glad to see this thread is at least classed "under consideration."
(Edited)
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Prairiedog

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The mower has it? My blower last year came with two 5 amps, so there is already headroom for sp like the mower. It was a dumb decision to go for the low hanging cheap fruit. without being able to add a SP Ego, they are losing our second purchase to the other company that makes one. Not happy about it though. Like the op , I'm older, smaller, and frankly too lightweight to provide the needed force to push it both up hill and through snow. I need a tool that will let me blow the whole drive if I don't have help. It just seems Ego is so focused on trying to convince guys it has the same capabilities as their boy toys, they are completely missing the natural wide open market for their products : women who want or need to do yard work themselves, but don't understand, or hate the hassle, weight, and mess of combustion engines. We have replaced both our 48" riding mower and our plow service with ego machines and haven't looked back. I hate I now will have another, incompatible charger set taking up space.
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Michael G

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I think there is a need/market for self propelled but the non-self propelled paddle model fits my needs.

Years ago I had a Toro curved paddle blower. I had it for 11 years and then decided to purchase a two-stage self propelled Craftsman with electric start. I didn't like it. Can't pick it up and move it to places my Toro would go. Had to move my miter saw out of my garage/shop to store it during the winter. Actually think the single stage moved wet snow better than the two stage. Just sold the Craftsman this weekend and ready to try out my new EGO.

Mike
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Jacob, Champion

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Good point
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JimD

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Neither light/small nor heavier/larger/self-propelled is perfect. There is a web video of someone blowing downhill to the street, then pulling the blower back to the top.  He walks very quickly downhill - likely faster than any self-propelled unit.  And the unit is light enough to pull uphill without blowing.  That's a nice tradeoff, and the overall time spent blowing may not be much different than with the large self-propelled blower that's hard to maneuver.  Plus you still have light/small for the non-driveway tasks.

Having hard snow to push into or to scrape off is the big challenge, but some changes may help overcome that.  And many snow removal sessions don't have those issues if you stay on top of it to avoid them.  Staying light/small increases ease of use and battery life.
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Prairiedog

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In my case we are on a hill, so most of the 300 ft drive is "up" from the garage, with a much steeper incline to the road so I can't just pull it up to blow down. I can do quite a bit with our push version from last year, and I love it, but the two drives to the street are beyond my physical capability. I am stuck with extended shoveling if I don't have help, which is pretty frustrating while I stare at the parked machine. So, yeah, it is not speed we are looking for, it 's the power assist up hill that would help us less burly folks. I learned this summer from our mowers what a help the SP is (yard is on the same incline). And yes, if it's a big snowfall, we are out blowing while the snow is falling. I will note, we found it throws much better if we let the snow get a little deeper.
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JimD

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Yup, that's a tough one.  I wonder if it would work to make your path across the width of the drive instead of the length to take away the steepness.  There would be a lot of turns, but light/small makes turning a lot easier.  You could even make a diagonal path and vary the angle as you go - mostly width-wise where it's steep, and mostly length-wise where it's flatter.  That give the opportunity for longer runs before turning where it's possible.
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Prairiedog

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Gosh, thanks for assuming it is just a matter of education, but I have spent my entire life in Minnesota, and am an old pro at snow management. At a 20" pass at best, your cross-drive solution would require 100s of u-turns after blowing just 12 feet under slippery conditions on a slope! Despite your confidence, the machine is not entirely easy for a small person to turn full around. You clearly do not understand the physics problems that are in play here. The most important point though, is why should anyone have to settle for awkward work-arounds, when the solution is available? Especially when another company offers to provide what I want, and Ego has proven they have the technology platform that could easily meet the demand? Rather than shrug it off, they just need to committ to building the machines a large segment of their public wants. Every week one of these posts goes up.
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(a)Typical Engineer

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Living in Hawaii, I have no idea of what is involved with snow blowing.  However, being an engineer, I do have an appreciation for the HSI, the Human Systems Interface.  Anything that can be improved to make the job easier for the operator should be considered.  Having SP functionality might be the difference between struggling to push a heavy blower up even a mild incline, potentially ice covered, falling and being injured; vs. engaging the SP and carefully walking up the same hill (Ego should consider adding a chair and call it a riding snow blower). =)

I agree that the SP sub-system of the mower could relatively easily be added to the non-SP version of the snow blower.  With 2x 7.5 AH batteries, that would be more than enough power (beyond belief).

What could potentially be "snowing-in" (sorry for the pun) the development of this product is the cost of development, against the potential sales.  My first thought is that most products can be used for 9 months out of the year, where as the snow blower is more like 3 months.  The numbers just might not add up to bringing the product to market.

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Joanne

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I've been to Hawaii and would love to live there except it's beyond my budget.  If you ever had to shovel a lot of snow, you would find that you are willing to pay a little more for those three months.   It's back breaking work and that's when I was young.   Now that I'm starting to lose muscle mass, as you do when you get older, you start looking for anything that will help.   My last snowblower cost much more than I wanted to pay - but it definitely has all the bells and whistles including turn assist so you don't have to jockey the machine around yourself.   It sure would be nice to have a battery operated one (and get rid of the messy smelly gasoline operated ones that gum up) that is self propelled and gee, while I'm dreaming, put turning assist on it.  Nothing is impossible, or so I am told.
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JimD

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Joanne, you're right. I was just trying some ideas.
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Joanne

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Oh, I wasn't being sarcastic.  Please don't take it that way.   Throwing around ideas is how to get things developed and done.    Thanks.
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Prairiedog

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Oh, Joanne, you didn't come off sarcastic at all, I probably did, grin. Yes! Turn assist would be a dream come true, but yeah, that might be asking a bit much at this price point, although I would be willing to pay the up-charge for the gain in safety. And up here in the great white north, 3 months counts as a non-winter. we've been known to have more snow blowing days than lawn mowing days, lol. Hawaii sounds divine.
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JimD

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Oops, I was referring to Prairiedog, not Joanne.
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TheAtomTwister

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Aye, nothing is impossible, and when all else fails, build it yourself.  You'll need to know your way around brushless motors and motor controllers, electric circuits a small bit and where to buy and craft parts, but building your own snowblower can be done.

Knowing EGO as I do, I would not be one bit surprised if they come out with a self-propelled snow blower sooner or later.  SCDC's famous want for an edger didn't get satisfied for a few years, then finally they come out with one and though I never saw him be happy as a clam over that on this forum, I'll bet he was.
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TheAtomTwister

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Aye, nothing is impossible, and when all else fails, build it yourself.  You'll need to know your way around brushless motors and motor controllers, electric circuits a small bit and where to buy and craft parts, but building your own snowblower can be done.

Knowing EGO as I do, I would not be one bit surprised if they come out with a self-propelled snow blower sooner or later.  SCDC's famous want for an edger didn't get satisfied for a few years, then finally they come out with one and though I never saw him be happy as a clam over that on this forum, I'll bet he was.
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J. G.

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Joanne,
I am 75 years old, and can relate.  I purchased my Ego Snow Blower in Dec 2015 after an 8" snow storm, in consideration for my years.  Today, 17 Jan 2018, we finally got snow in the Piedmont of North Carolina, and I was able to use my snow blower for the first time.  (It turned 2 days of shoveling into 2 sessions of 45 minutes each, so I am happy, but . . . ) 

The speed lever on the snow blower is just like the one on my self-propelled 21" Ego mower, so I'm thinking the blower is self-propelled, but no.  Even though our 7" snow was light and fluffy, I had a heck of a time pushing the blower up my long driveway, especially on the first run.  I came to the Ego web site in search of a self-propelled blower, but was disappointed.  Then I saw your post.  Thanks for starting the thread.  I hope Ego releases a self-propelled snow blower before I croake.  Fingers crossed!
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Joanne

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Keeping my fingers crossed too!   We both had the same storm.   Got 9 inches here in Hudson Valley, New York.   I would never have been able to push a snowblower through it.  Hope EGO comes out with one soon.     Hey Ego, I'd be glad to your elderly female tester for your self-propelled snowblower when you develope it.   :-)
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Erik

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I RRRRREALLY RRRREALY hope they're working on a monster brushless motor 2 to 3 battery Self Propelled 2 Stage. I've been using their single stage here in Minnesota since last year, and it mostly has it's uses, 12-15" snow isn't one. I knew that buying it. But we haven't had a bad winter here in a while.

Some spots I had to blow were up to 24". Again I know that isn't what this was built for. I got the job done repeatedly ramming it into the snow, I'm feeling it today!

I have no problem maintaining gas but don't want to. So please EGO we need a SP monster brushless 2 stage snow blower!
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szwoopp, Champion

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yea single stage blowers just aren't made for 20" but can still be useful.  I remember as a kid using our single stage Toro (last time I used a snow blower until this year).
When I would get to the big drifts or area where the plow left its gift, I would take a shovel and knock down the pile to create a manageable height of snow.  Blow that off the driveway and repeat on the next section of deep snow.  I took some time, but was still better than shoveling in full and worked a lot better than ramming the snow blower with a 12" tall mouth into a 20" deep pile of snow.
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Erik

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I did some of that too. Took forever
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Prairiedog

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Second, third, 20th! This has to be done. In mn too, and I could not manage more than 2 trips up and down our 200 ft driveway in our 10 inches of fairly compact snow here with higher drifts before I cried uncle. bad when the shovel is easier and faster. The machine was willing, but the body was too weak to push it.
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Erik

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I'm in St Paul MN. Got over 14". I did my driveway about 2 cars wide 2 deep, 120ft of sidewalk, recharged batteries, did the neighbors 4 carling driveway and some more sidewalk. I am feeling tired today and looking at gas 2 stages haha.
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Michael G

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Erik - if EGO were to design the single stage to let the paddles make contact with the pavement like the single stage gas models this would drastically aid in pulling the machine forward. Just wondering would this make the battery life unacceptable?
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Erik

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I have no idea, I would assume the resistance would put higher load on it causing more battery drain but that's just a guess. This thing is fine for snow falls under the height of the opening, as stated less then 11 or 10 inches or something like that.

It's been good for almost all snow falls in the 2 winters I've had it now until yesterday. I hope they heard us and are working on something for bigger snowfalls.
This reply was created from a merged topic originally titled snow blower - single stage , self-propelled.

Keeping the lighter weight and smaller size of a single-stage blower would be great if possible.  Maybe these adjustments would work. I would be fun to try.
  1. make the auger height adjustable
    Keep it high to preserve battery when self-propel not needed (lighter snow, flatter surface). Lower it near surface when self-propel needed. Maybe the auger doesn't need to exactly contact the surface to do some propelling. Keep the scraper to clean the surface.

    Gas single stage blowers with auger contacting pavement tend to vibrate a lot. With adjustability, the user can choose the best setting for the conditions.  

  2. eliminate frontal surfaces inside and outside the auger cavity that push snow
    The frontal areas inside the cavity like at the lights and below, plus the auger bearing bulges, might be pushing snow which will resist forward motion. Two-stage blowers usually have a curved cavity with no frontal surfaces, so the cavity doesn't push snow unless the snow gets to the back of the cavity.

    The drive side of the cavity has a belt and sprockets that make frontal space. Thin-as-possible dimensions on these could help? Putting this frontal space inside the cavity but after the auger has broken up the snow would help, but I'm not seeing a way to do that. Driving the auger from the middle instead of the side would eliminate this issue, maybe driving from the top of the cavity so something is not in the path of snow going into the chute. I don't know if you can drive this way as efficiently as belt-and-sprocket.

  3. The combination of these and other's ideas might might do the job: a V-shaped scraper to avoid jolts from surface joints, scraper redesign to prevent it from digging in and resisting in stiff snow conditions, and something (shoes?) to set scraper height.
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Brad Snyder

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I have a 200 foot long sloped driveway that gets plenty of drifting (hard crusty snow).  We have had plenty of storms that have delivered around 20" of snow lately, and one storm of 36".  I need to buy a new two stage self propelled snow blower.  If Ego is within a year of delivering, I might be able to wait, but if not, I will need to buy another brand this fall.