Say it ain't so.....!!!

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Hi, I am starting my 3rd summer with the 56V 5.0A push mower. The past two seasons have been great. No problems. I sharpen the blades almost every time I mow, and I try to keep the battery in the cool house (instead of the hot garage). However, this season I'm noticing my battery is only lasting half as long as last season before it needs recharging. I used to be able to mow my 0.4 acre yard without need to recharge, but this season, I keep having to recharge the battery mid-mow. I'm concerned that the battery is already 'wearing out.'  What should I do? Is this normal? I would hope that I wouldn't need to get a new battery already. 
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Dan Sterner

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Posted 1 month ago

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Oregon Mike, Champion

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Official Response
Your battery has a 3 year warranty. Give EGO CS a call and they will take care of you.
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Frank Woodbery

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Mike - I actually don't have a battery issue, but what is considered cause for a warranty replacement? Losing 50% run time? How about losing 20%, or even 10%? Hate to sound cynical here but seems like potential for abuse and false warranty claims, or even people abusing their batteries at the 2 1/2 year mark just to intentionally degrade their battery to score a new one.
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Oregon Mike, Champion

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Frank, since I'm not an EGO employee I can't answer that but an EGO CS agent can. I imagine there are standards they go by, but one can only find out by calling. Why not call? The battery is still within the warranty period.
I believe the EGO CS agents might have a sequence of questions to ask to find out about abuse so maybe they have ways to address concerns about false warranty claims. 
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pete Brenenstuhl

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Hi Dan.. your battery degradation seems to be on par with every battery device I have ever owned... however Ego does say in my manual that extended parking in the charger when the battery is fully charged  may shorten the battery life in stages,,,my weed Wacker, drill and blower have all suffered this condition after a year or two,,( even my RIOBY stuff) ,I  bought a spare battery last year and rotate them. the new .one is smaller and cheaper which I use for back up or small jobs,, but I do take them out of the charger after they are charged and just give them a refresh before I use them again and its going on three years now and they both accept a full charge,, I have about the same size lot.  Good luck   Oete 
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Oregon Mike, Champion

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Pete, where are you reading about storing the battery on the charger shortening the life in stages? In a charger manual, or battery manual? If so, which charger or battery manual does it say that?
(Edited)
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William E Hanson

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Leaving a charged battery in the charger shouldn't have a negative effect unless your area is humid enough that could corrode the contacts.
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Dan Sterner

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Pete, yes, I typically take the battery off the charger. I did this religiously the first two seasons, and I must admit, I'm getting lazing this season so far. I hope that's not the reason I'm experiencing this sudden drop off, but given what you've said, I have to admit it's a possibility. Serious design flaw if that is indeed the case. 
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Ken, Champion

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I'm don't know whether leaving the battery on the charger all the time is the source of your problem, but regardless, it isn't a design flaw. Lithium-ion batteries, regardless of manufacturer, don't like to be stored at 100 percent charge for long periods of time (or at zero charge, for that matter).
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Oregon Mike, Champion

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^^^That's right. And since the charger shuts off once it has finished charging a battery, there doesn't seem to be any risk of anything happening to a battery if it stays on the charger. The battery will perform its normal maintenance function to 30% if left on, or off, the charger for more than 30 days. To recharge it, it has to be removed from the charger and placed back on the charger. That's sort of why I'm wondering where, exactly, Pete read about the battery degrading by stages if left on the charger because my manuals, 2.5 and 5 ah batteries and standard and quick chargers, say it's ok to leave the battery on the charger.
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Dan Sterner

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Ken, so are you saying that I shouldn't have fully charged the battery and 'stored' it for winter?  I'm sorry, but I can't understand why it is so nuanced, from a consumer perspective. Does it state any of this in the operation manual? 
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szwoopp, Champion

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From the manual

WHEN TO CHARGE THE BATTERY PACK

NOTICE:Lithium-Ion battery packs are shipped partially charged. Before using it the first time, fully charge the battery pack.

NOTICE:This battery pack is equipped with an advanced self-maintenance function to extend the battery life. Depending on the battery charge, it will automatically perform a self-discharge operation after one month of storage. After this self-maintenance, the battery pack will enter sleep mode and maintain 30% of its charge capacity. If stored for a month or longer, fully recharge the battery before the next use.

It is not necessary to run down the battery pack charge before recharging. The Lithium-Ion battery can be charged at any time and will not develop a “memory” when charged after only a partial discharge. Use the power indicator to determine when the battery pack needs to be recharged


For Lithium-Ion battery pack storage longer than 30 days:
Store the Lithium-Ion battery pack where the temperature is below 80°F (26°C) and free of moisture.
  Store Lithium-Ion battery packs in a 30%-50% charged condition.
 Every six months of storage, fully charge the Lithium-Ion battery pack.
 Exterior may be cleaned with a cloth or soft non-metallic brush.

NOTICE: This battery pack has equipped with an advanced self-maintenance function. It can maintain 30% of its charge capacity automatically after it is stored over one month
(Edited)
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Dan Sterner

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Thanks for the reminder!
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Ken, Champion

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Yes, it can be that nuanced.

Teslas, for example, by default don't charge to 100 percent. If you're going on a longer trip where you need the full 100 percent you have to manually set them to charge that way.

My drone batteries have an auto-discharge function for storage, like Ego's batteries do, except you can set how many days before they discharge. Most people in the drone community have them set to discharge after two or three days of not being used. And the charger can charge them to 65 percent for storage.

Typically, I don't recharge my Ego batteries after I use them, unless I know they've been significantly depleted. Then I will give them a partial charge. Otherwise, I charge them the day before I plan to use them.

Think of it this way: It's still way less hassle than getting a gasoline-powered tool ready for winter storage. 
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Dan Sterner

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Amen, brother!
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Frank Woodbery

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I don't where you guys live but I've never winterized any gas powered tool. I do use ethanol-free gas. I live near relatively mild Portland Oregon.
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Prairiedog

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This affects us up here in the tundra without heated garages. Your tools probably don't spend 5 or six months below freezing, with prolonged stints well below zero. 
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Ken, Champion

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Same here in Iowa. A lot of people here have detached garages and it can get to 10 below zero or colder.
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Frank Woodbery

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Outside winter lows here are in the 20° - 25° range. Warmer inside the attached garage. But I do remove any batteries and keep them inside year round.
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William E Hanson

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Great information, Ken. But I use my batteries year round and always charge fully once the red light comes on. My garage where they're stored is well insulated and ranges between 40s-80s.
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dzzmiller

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It's also best to charge before use, if that is approach is practical. LiON batteries don't like to sit at 100% charge.

A second point is that it is usually preferable to buy the 7.5Ah battery for mowing and snow blowing. The largest size both reduces depth of discharge and provides a reserve as total capacity declines.
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Dan Sterner

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Yeah, sorry. I am not going to spend $350 for a different battery. I'll continue to use the one that came with the mower for now and just deal with these ups and downs. Thanks
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Ken, Champion

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Mowing with the 5.0 Ah battery is just fine. There's no need to go out and buy a new battery unless you have an actual need for a second battery. I didn't have a 7.5Ah battery until last month. This marks my fourth season mowing 7,500 square feet with either a 4.0Ah or 5.0 Ah battery, and both batteries behave like they were new.

That said, if you buy another Ego tool it's always nice to get the kit that comes with an additional battery.
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Prairiedog

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As Mike said, and if you read the manual, Egos have built in safeguards that prevent them sitting at 100% so that is a non-issue. I'm more suspicious that it is the lush spring grass that is a more likely cause. Grass is going ape with all the moisture, at least around the midsection of the country. The denser grass makes the mower work harder. We see this every spring to some extent, then by midsummer, we are back to normal run times. Still, call CS, maybe your decline is more than normal.
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Dan Sterner

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Prairiedog, I think you just describe what I was thinking last night as I was mowing. The first two cuts, my grass was super green and lush. It's starting to wear off a little bit, and I think the same thing happened to me last year. So, last night, I was able to get much closer to finishing my lawn in one charge. 
Bottom line: I think this was much ado about nothing! Thanks for the responses though!
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bloomz

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I had the same deterioration - mine was lasting about half as long in my 2nd summer with it.  (Oregon doesn't have a long mowing season, less than half the year)

Ego was great about replacing it for me.

But I think about every rechargeable battery - ever.  They all deteriorate.  Best cell battery I've ever had is with my newest Galaxy S10 plus - first couple months it would go all day on 15-20%.  Now I've noticed it's using about 35% about 3 months in.

But they don't come with a 3 year battery warranty!
(Edited)