Possible Rust on Mower?!?

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  • Updated 3 months ago
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  • (Edited)
I have only had my Power + mower for a little over a month and have used it 5 times.  I noticed when I was brushing out the undercarriage that the bar between the rear wheels seemed to have a rust starting on it.  I do not mow the lawn wet and I have not hosed the mower off.  I am wondering if this is happening just from the grass wetness from being cut and if anyone else has had an issue.
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Janet Bender

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Posted 3 years ago

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I Dexter

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Hope someone replies to this, as I have concerns about the same issue...
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Jennifer VandeWater, Community Manager

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Official Response
Janet, can you post a picture here of what you are seeing?  That will help us try to figure out what might be going on.
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Janet Bender

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My rust area is much the same as I Dexter's. Will try the suggestiins mentioned but would be great if EGO would include this as a heads up. Loving the mower!!!!!!♡♡♡♡
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chuck

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Got an Ego 21” mower last month, have used 4-5 times when cleaning underside there is rust on every single metal part.
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Oregon Mike, Champion

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I think most, if not all, of the hardware is stainless so pretty unlikely rust is coming from that. In this pic it looks more like either pollen or dirt. 
I do have to say my 21" mower never looked that shiny or black. What is the model # of this one?
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Exrace

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That does look like dirt residue. I use to work on power equipment and have noticed this on equipment that is used in areas that have red clay. Red clay gets everywhere.
 
Red clay is often used in dyeing T-shirts in Hawaii so it is known to stain pretty much anything. I have one such t-shirt that is over 10 years old and is still red!
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Jacob

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Either that or it is grass pollen. It dyes my shirts orange all of the time. Stupid grass pollen
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Ken, Champion

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It's definitely not rust. There's more of it on plastic parts than there is on the metal parts, which are stainless.
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szwoopp, Champion

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Leaf blower may take care of that "rust"
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I Dexter

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I'm curious if Janet is talking about the same signs of rust as I show here on my EGO 21" SP mower.  Mine is about 3 months old, and I've used it 2 - 3 times a week on dry grass. I'd be interested to hear if we're experiencing the same issue...
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Blue Angel, Champion

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While I certainly can't see a whole lot of detail from a picture, it would seem as though what is on that shaft is not too much more than some surface corrosion.

Most people have seen an old car or tractor abandoned for decades in a field, the original paint having been lost a long time ago, leaving only a bare metal surface to weather away in the elements. In many cases these are the surfaces of relatively thin, stamped sheet metal parts. Though they are rusty they are still largely intact.

Another example is the exhaust system on a relatively new car being rusty looking, yet it is designed to last for a minimum of 8 years and 100,000 miles.

Many surfaces will show a level of corrosion soon after being put into service, but will outlast the equipment. In some cases a layer of corrosion actually benefits the component by protecting it from the elements. Not all "rust" is the same, and certainly shouldn't be associated with the salt fueled cancer that eats cars in northern climates.

I have no idea what the exact material or coating processes are on the Ego mower driveshaft, but I don't think what I see in that picture is anything to be worried about. If you start seeing severe pitting and/or flaking of material, then I would be concerned. :-)
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Exrace

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I love your blue mower. :) 
I have noticed same and Have spayed mine with wd40. Steel wool and wd40 will take the surface rust right off.
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I Dexter

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Steel wool and WD40 did the trick ! :-)  
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Dave .

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Get some Boeshield T9 corrosion protection spray.  it's nothing short of amazing.  Of course you need to remove the rust first.  Pick your favorite method for doing that.  But no matter what you do to remove the rust, T9 is the cat's meow for preventing rust.  re-apply from time to time.
(Edited)
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I Dexter

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Have cleaned the rust off, as suggested above with steel wool and WD 40.  Will look for the Boeshield T9!
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Dave .

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if you can't find it locally, Amazon has it.  $18.  lasts a long time.
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David HD, Champion

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Thanks.  I get free shipping with Amazon since I am a Prime Member, so I will definitely take advantage of this product.
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I Dexter

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Found the Boeshield T9 at my local Sears for $22.  
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Dave .

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ouch!
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David HD, Champion

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As much as I love to support Sears, and I have for over 20 years - I just can't afford to buy anything from them anymore.  Everything is expensive and over priced vs. HD and other hardware stores.
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David HD, Champion

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Thanks for heads up, will check this out on my next trip to the hard ware store.
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Jennifer VandeWater, Community Manager

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Official Response
Thanks for sharing the images.  We've escalated this to our R&D team for further review.
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Blue Angel, Champion

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My personal point of view on this matter. Take it with a grain of salt since I can't see what you will see as I don't have this mower.

Some forms of surface corrosion will actual protect the surface of a part. If you are continuously removing it with an abrasive you will be weakening the part through gradual material removal. Unless the corrosion is leading to deep pitting and/or flaking, I would be tempted to just leave it alone while keeping an eye on it.

Also, if there are any engineered coatings present on the metal when the part is manufactured, using an abrasive will remove them which could also expose the part and exacerbate the issue.

If it was me and my mower, I might be tempted to apply a light oil to it and just leave it alone, that way you're protecting the part and not removing any material.

Once again, just my point of view. :-)
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Dave .

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I have to disagree with you, Blue.  If you remove corrosion (it's not like you are portraying a normal situation, ie, according to you,"continuously removing it with an abrasive") once in a blue moon, prior to applying a rust preventative THAT ACTUALLY WORKS, such as T9, you are far better off than letting the rust accumulate.  Did you not know that rust propagates if given the chance?   here's a small quote, " As a result, rust self-propagates by expanding and flaking away, exposing fresh base metal that begins corroding in turn." that sums it up short and sweetly. 

For the benefit of readers here who are thinking of heeding Blue's advice:  DON'T.
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Blue Angel, Champion

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Better get your T9 and sandpaper out and start "saving" the exhaust system on your car then! ;-)

As I said above, if there's severe pitting or flaking then by all means try to do something about it. If the surface of the metal is simply a little rough and discolored, monitor the situation and treat if it worsens. If it stabilizes then don't worry about it.

Stable surface corrosion is one thing, thickening flaking rust (rot) is something else completely.
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Dave .

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"monitor" the situation?   LOL!  Reminds me of going to the doc and having them measure a mole.  tell you what--you monitor, or ignore.  I'll coat my tools that are prone to rusting, and call it a day.
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Blue Angel, Champion

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Let me quote myself:

"If it was me and my mower, I might be tempted to apply a light oil to it and just leave it alone, that way you're protecting the part and not removing any material."

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Exrace

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Box of chocolates...
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Jacob

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Wow. Thanks for being nice about it dave. .
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Jennifer VandeWater, Community Manager

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Official Response
All, our team took a look at these images and that kind of surface corrosion (really more discoloring than anything) should not affect performance and durability in any way.  We are, however, having the team review some kind of solution going forward.  A reminder that your tools are covered by a 5 year warranty and if performance is affected in a negative way, we're only a phone call away to get help.
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Blue Angel, Champion

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Thanks Jennifer!
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I Dexter

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Super, thank you Jennifer!
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Janet Bender

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Thank you Jennifer.  :-)