Nexus power station. Power consumption calculation seems incorrect.

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  • Updated 5 months ago
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I connect a 13 watt CFL light to the nexus power station. In the app it shows me that the power consumption for that outlet is 21 Watts.
My question is , how is this calculated? Is it factoring in other things or is this supposed to be just the actual power used by the load?
I have a WiFi plug that measures the power as well and it is spot on at 13 watts for this light bulb. Hence I’m trying to figure out and understand what I am seeing on the nexus power station.
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William

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Posted 5 months ago

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William

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The power station measurement is indeed correct. I checked the cfl bulb and it has a power factor of 0.6. This is the reason the nexus power station has to supply 21VA to the light.
(Edited)
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Ken, Champion

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Thanks for the update, William.

I just recently picked up the Power Station but haven't had a chance to do anything apart from get it connected to Bluetooth and Wi-Fi.

I don't know much about power consumption and so forth, so I'm looking forward to seeing how the estimated time compares with actual time.
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William

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Hi Ken, there are quite a few factors that will influence the time estimation, but so far I am happy with what I am seeing. I think maybe customers will benefit from more information about different loads, like inductive and pure resistive loads. Since the nexus power station needs to supply the VA ( real and apparent power ) and not only the real ( resistive power ) in Watts. Since the VA’s are normally more in some loads the power consumption of the load is higher than what the load is rated in Watts. Hence the time the nexus power station will be able to power the load will be less that expected.
There’s also the issue that sine wave inverters are not very efficient at small loads. ( loads which draw less than 30 % of the total power capability of the inverter ).
But there’s not much that can be done to change that.
As a suggestion it might be a good idea for consumers to purchase a simple device like a “kill a watt” measurement device. This was they can measure the VA’s of a load before connecting it to the nexus power station. It will give them some idea of how efficient the load is and how long it is expected to last.
I do own a dual power generator, but I would like to use the nexus power station for power outages of less that a day.
I’d really be interested to see what solar charging options ego comes up with. I’d be happy to see a separate solar charger. In that way the batteries can just be swapped out instead of moving the entire nexus power station.