Nexus Escape overloaded by 70-watt inflator

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  • Updated 9 months ago
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I was hoping to be able to use the Nexus Escape to power a small tire inflator.

(This, specifically: https://www.blackanddecker.com/products/power-tools/portable-power-tools/inflators/high-performance-...)

When I turn it on, the inverter goes right into overloaded mode (red flashing light, no power). I thought I might have exceeded the power limit, but I measured and the inflator seems to use about 70 watts, well below the 150-watt limit. (I'm sure it peaks a bit a startup, but I never saw a reading over 80 watts.)

Is this expected behavior? I see in the thread below that people are seeing inconsistent results with AC-based devices, but it still seems a bit odd that the inverter acts as if I've exceeded its max supported power.

https://community.egopowerplus.com/ego/topics/very-disappointed-with-the-new-nexus-inverter-returnin...
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Dan Smith

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Posted 9 months ago

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Tae Cooke

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If you can figure out the power factor of the pump, that could help diagnose the problem. Divide the rate power by the power factor to get the apparent power, which the inverter would have to supply. AC motors are inductive loads, which the current generation of inverter isn't designed to power. Such a load can require many times the real power in apparent power, which would cause the overload condition you're seeing.
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Dan Smith

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I’m measuring the actual power drawn with a meter on the outlet, so I don’t think this advice will help? When plugged into a wall outlet, about 70 watts are drawn.
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Oregon Mike, Champion

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Tae's advice is very good. Measuring an outlet is a different waveshape than what the inverter puts out. The sine wave from the outlet is exactly what the motor needs to run so power measurements won't be equivalent to what the square wave is trying to put out to run that motor. 
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Oregon Mike, Champion

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It may have more to do with it being an inductive load and not doing well with the square wave the inverter puts out. A lot of the inverter's energy is being lost to heat since the inductive load doesn't want to run off of the square wave giving you the overload indication.
(Edited)
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Blue Angel, Champion

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I'm not sure if it could have been condensed into something brief that made sense to most people, but a small disclaimer about what types of devices the Nexus was intended to work with could have saved a lot of customer disappointment in the product.  Even something as simple as "May not power motorized devices" could have been useful.
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summetj

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Yes, as inverters go, it is an extremely limited one. Low watts AND square wave (not even a modified sine wave).   Since it's limited to 150 watts, a pure sine wave output so it would actually run most low wattage devices would have been nice.

That being said, I decided to keep mine (got a 25$ off coupon so it was only 75$) and I've collected a few devices that I know will work with it (hot glue gun without a "high-low" switch, motorized fan that buzzes a bit but turns, specific brand of LED light bulb, laptop charger) and plan to use it primarily for device charging (USB ports & small switching power supplies) and as my remote hot glue gun driver.

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Blue Angel, Champion

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Good approach! Definitely a good idea to test things out before the power goes out and “surprise!”, it doesn’t power what you need it to.