Nexus And Submersible Pump

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Will the Nexus work with the 1/2 hp submerisble pump I have?  Was thinking it sure would beat dragging out the extension cords when needing to use pump for my pool.

PUMP:  Wayne VIP50 1/2 HP 
Power supply required . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 volt, 60 Hz
Motor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Single phase, oil filled
Motor full load amps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.2 amps (1/5 & 1/4 HP)
8.5 amps (1/2 HP)
Thermal protector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Automatic reset
Liquid temperature range. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40°F to 120°F
Operating position. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vertical
Circuit requirement (minimum) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Amps
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luddy

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Posted 1 week ago

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szwoopp, Champion

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Based on other equipment that has been tested or analyzed - the answer is likely no it will not work.

And per this chart a pump requires more than 150W to operate.
https://www.generatorjoe.net/html/electricmotor.html

So, I think your answer is no it will not run the pump.
(Edited)
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Blue Angel, Champion

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Correct. The Nexus is rated for 150W continuous output, about 1/5 hp. However, the startup current of a motor is higher than its continuous draw, so the Nexus will only power an even smaller motor.
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luddy

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Thanks, I didn't think so since I think 150W is only about .2 HP.

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Tae Cooke

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Running an inductive load (motor) off a modified sine inverter is asking for trouble, regardless of whether it fits with the power rating! The Nexus inverter should only be used with resistive loads or ones with active power supplies. (If you happen to know the power factor of the pump, divide the pump's power by the power factor to get the apparent power, which will be higher!)
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Dennis Mathias

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NO. 740 watts! You only have 150.
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Dennis Mathias

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Has anyone looked at that sine wave? I assume it's stepped. I wonder if you ran it through a transformer (1:1) if that would smooth the waveform.
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Oregon Mike, Champion

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Someone did. Was it szwoopp? Anyway, it's a square wave. 
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Tae Cooke

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Transformers work on the derivative of the voltage, so no, that wouldn't help. You'd need a pretty hefty low-pass filter that rolls off between 60 and 120Hz, which would need to be tuned for the load. If we're talking about a motor, it could in theory be the L in your filter. So could the transformer. Add in a beefy capacitor and you have yourself a RLC circuit to analyze for best performance.