New to EGO and want to set up good battery and charger habits.

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First rookie question...I bought a couple lithium storage explosion bags to store them in since I'm storing them inside my home.   Is that likely to sweat on the inside of the bag possibly doing the battery damage?    Second rookie question.... I've read in this forum that these batteries emit harmful chemicals but I don't know if the  EGO tech was referring to when they're being charged or  during heavy use or ONLY if damaged?   When I bring the charger in the house out of the cold I do notice a mild odor.   
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j w

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Posted 1 year ago

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(a)Typical Engineer

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You should only experience condensation problems if the ambient and component temperatures are changing.  If you allow the batteries to cool, then place them in the bags, I don't see condensation building up that way.  If you're concerned, you could add those desiccant packs.  Also, Ego batteries are weather resistant, specifically the electronic modules are encased in weatherproofing, so condensation should not affect them.

The question of odor has been asked before, and the answer was something related to ozone.  For the most part, Lithium Ion batteries should not be putting out an odors.  If they are, it is likely due to improper charging or damage. One other source of odor from the charger could be the electronics baking off some of the construction material (adhesives, paints, etc.).  After 3-5 uses, it should not be putting out odors on a continuous basis (unless there is a problem).

Best practice would probably be to NOT charge indoors.  When I charge my batteries, I do so in the garage, and never unattended.  Once they are done charging, I remove the battery from the charger and unplug the charger from the wall.  That is the "lowest" or most disconnected state, which should be the safest (the battery could still have an issue, but not likely).

Also, Lithium Batteries last longest when stored in a 30-50% charged state; which is why Ego batteries have the build-in self-discharge after approximately 30 days (down to 30%).  When I use my Ego tools, I usually stop once the red light comes on (and sometimes before).  Then I let them cool down to ambient temperature.  If they got down to red, which is 15%, I'll throw them on charger for 10-15 minutes to bring them back up to about 50% for storage (until the next week) [sometimes I use the rapid charger, and bring them back up to two solid charge lights (50%)].
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j w

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Thanks fir the GREAT information! I have one question....do the batteries get hot when they auto discharge to 30% while in Storage ? Thanks again!
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(a)Typical Engineer

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The end cap with the button/light gets warm but the rest of the battery remains cool, which is different from when you use the battery in a tool, and the entire battery is warm.  Also, depending on your ambient temperature, you might not be able to tell that it is discharging, probably about 85F.
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j w

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I GREATLY appreciate your time and informative answers!    As far as the question of "odor" is concerned...MAYBE it's the hydrogen gas?....in one of the community responses they copied and pasted from the book that batteries vent hydrogen gas and can explode in the presence of a pilot light etc.   Obviously it's not a problem...just don't store it  near a flame but is it possible the slight odor coming from the charger AND the batteries is hydrogen gas?  I assume it's not enough to be harmful to breathe it, just because we noticed the smell?    IF the odor isn't hydrogen gas then I'm sure it's the initial baking off the construction materials adhesives for the first few uses like you mentioned earlier.  It's VERY unusual to be able to get educated straight honest answers from the experts!  Thanks again for your help.
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szwoopp, Champion

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Ditto j w
I have learned a lot from the great people on this board.  Some of it I absorbed and some of it is way over my heard, but interesting none the less.
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lead acid batteries put off hydrogen gas; lithium ion batteries do not, unless they catastrophically fail like the samsung galaxy, then you get a fireworks show too! =)  here is a good read on general battery handling for all types:

http://batteryuniversity.com/learn/article/health_concerns

"Lithium-ion is also benign — the battery contains little toxic material. Nevertheless, caution is required when working with a damaged battery. When handling a spilled battery, do not touch your mouth, nose or eyes. Wash your hands thoroughly."
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