motor power

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  • Updated 3 years ago
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what is the nominal power of the snowblower's motor in watts?
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Alex Bejan

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Posted 3 years ago

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Jacob

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Official Response
2000 watts
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Alex Bejan

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Thanks, so theoretically you can run it for 42 minutes with 2x7.5 Ah batteries.
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Blue Angel, Champion

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Theoretically, two 420Wh batteries would power a 2000W motor for (420x2)/2000 = 0.42h, or 25 min. I think you forgot one step. :-)

Having said that, no job will keep the blower running at 100% load for anywhere near that much time! That would be the equivalent of blowing the snow plow pile on the side of a rural road non-stop until the batteries were dead... not a practical example.

Workshop Addict reviewed the 10Ah snowblower kit and did an extremely impressive amount of work on a single charge of the batteries. The 15Ah kit should do at least 50% more than that. Look up their review on YouTube. I have a feeling the average homeowner will get over an hour of use out of the 15Ah kit.
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Alex Bejan

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Yes, thanks for the correction and the pointer to the review. The rest of your comment was very useful too.
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Blue Angel, Champion

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Any time, Alex! Be sure to check back in with a review if you do buy the Ego snowblower. :-)
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matt.mackinnon

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The answer is not quite as simple as just deviding out the motor wattage by the power in the battery.  The motor will have a service factor that needs to be known as the 2000w motor with a 25% SF can use 2500w of power for short bursts.  Like when you run the blower into a deep packed snowbank.
As well you need to figure in the effeciancy of the battery to supply to power to the motor.  If running at idle and having little current draw the battery will loose little power to heat, but when you put the battery under serious load, it will loose effeciancy to deliver power giving part of the output to heat.

Sadly the question of asking how long the snowblower will run for is a bit like asking how long is a piece of string.  Without knowing far more details around what you are plowing, the best you can get is an average user should get responce that might have no bearing on what you will get.