Looking for Snow Blower Impressions and/or Experience

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I purchased an EGO snow blower since I really liked their lawn care products and wanted to downsize from a 2-stage model. I did some research but like other big purchases now that I have it in hand and looked it over I have some concerns even though I'm only a little bit into my 90 day return window. 

  1. Paddle design - never thought to research the paddle design of the EGO before my purchase but looking at it in the garage maybe I should have. Before I bought a 2-stage a fcouple years back I had a Toro CCR2000. It had the curved paddle design. The paddles on the Toro were designed to touch the pavement if you lifted a bit on the handle. The paddles rubbing the pavement also propelled the blower (these paddles lasted 8-years). After snow blowing I could even see faint swirl marks from the paddles on the pavement. I see on the EGO the paddles seem to be designed to never touch the pavement. Even when I tilt it forward the paddles are a good 3/4" off the pavement. 
  2. Scraper Bar - before purchase I did see a few complaints about the scraper bar but thought this was an easy part for EGO to redesign. But, now that I looked at the machine due to (1) above I'm thinking the EGO scraper is being asked to do way too much work. The scraper bar on most single stage blowers is to protect the metal edge at the rear of the machine. Since the EGO paddles don't scrape the pavement the scraper bar does this and thus the leading edge is very sharp/pointy and looks to be prone to aggressive wear.
  3. Propelling Assist - since the paddles don't actually touch the pavement I'm concerned more human power will be required to move this machine along as compared to a paddle system that does like my old Toro.
  4. Metal Sidewall Wear - I read here some put edging on the sidewalls to prevent damage to them. After looking at my EGO since the paddles don't touch the pavement after tilting it forward the next thing to touch the pavement after the scraper is the sidewalls.
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Michael G

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Posted 8 months ago

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Prairiedog

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We love ours, self-propelled would obviously be better, (as everyone else is clamoring for) but it works slick on our 200 ft of drive. everyone else I've convinced to get one loves theirs too. don't over think it?
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szwoopp, Champion

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All valid points that have been raised before on this board.  It is either going to meet your needs and expectations or it will not and you can probably convince yourself one way or the other if you try hard enough.  As Prariedog said - don't over think it.  Use it and let the results be the judge.

Hopefully, it gets the job done for you.
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Prairiedog

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Wait, I'm confused, 4 days ago you gave a review of your first use. You seemed pleased and said it was light to push, etc. In this post today, it sounds like you haven't tried it?
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Michael G

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These comments came after looking at the snow blower last night. I looked at the scraper bar and noticed some wear already but time will tell the maintenance interval. While looking at the scraper I noticed the large gap between the paddles and the floor and tilted it forward and found that they never touch the ground. This shocked me - maybe just a paradigm from my Toro experience. I was just looking for experienced users comments on the self pulling capability of this machine since it doesn't have the the paddles hitting the pavement pulling it forward. Maybe pulling in the snow is enough.

And yes I tried it but on just over an inch of snow. Maybe should have held off on the post until I tried it on some significant snowfall.
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Blue Angel, Champion

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1. The scraper seems to do a decent job of cleaning right to the asphalt. I didn’t check it for wear after one use.

2. The scraper seems to catch out interlocking brick less than the metal edge of my shovel does, a nice surprise. A trick I use with my shovel is to hold it at a slight angle to the bricks which helps dramatically. This also works well for the expansion joints in the sidewalk.

3. After using mine in 7-8” the other day, the only time I felt I needed to really push it was at the end of the driveway in the plow pile. Going through normal snow on asphalt seemed pretty easy.

4. I think you’d have to tilt the machine forward quite a bit to get the metal to touch the ground. I think most people are protecting that edge from hitting other obstacles.

I would certainly wait until you’ve used it a few times in decent snow accumulations before passing your final judgment. Overall I’m fairly impressed with mine so far. The chute direction works great and I love the variable speed auger!
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Michael G

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Thanks Blue - exactly what I was looking for!

Mike
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Blue Angel, Champion

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Any time, Mike!

I will admit, I ordered a spare scraper for mine already just in case. You never know if it will catch on something and chip or break.

I was lucky with my SnoJoe, the scraper lasted two seasons without breaking. That’s a much lighter machine, though. The heavier Ego might not fare so well if the scraper catches while moving at speed. Time will tell.