I am worried about getting the battery in and out, is there a handle for pulling up the battery, I have small hands. Not so strong.

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It looks hard to get the battery in and out, as the door on the battery compartment won't hold open, and I don't see a handle on the battery. I am 68 with small hands, that are not all that strong. This could be a dream mower if the battery is easy to handle.
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Theresa Pipes

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Posted 2 years ago

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Jacob

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It would be easy to make a velcro strap that goes around the battery.. it would have to go around the top by the button.

There ya go ego. We need a battery strap.. do it.
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TK

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I too vote for a strap....


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charlie hepler

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It is easy. Just push the button and it jumps up at ya!
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Karen Crosby

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I'm 58 with small hands, but still strong enough. The battery weight is heaviest for the big one, for an hour of mowing, but you could use smaller ones and switch them out more often, and they would be lighter for you. I suggest you go see this mower, try taking out the battery, so you can know for sure. I don't have any trouble with it. It's like a bag of sugar.
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Blue Angel, Champion

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Karen, good suggestion. Just know that the smallest batteries, the 2 and 2.5Ah, won't be able to drive the mowers to 100% of their potential. This might be an issue in thicker grass.
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bloomz

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My smaller battery on me tends to red light often, even before it is dead.
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David Cline

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I think the power draw makes it hard for the battery to measure the 15% remaining, or it may be related to the big rebound after resting. The mower does quickly turn to red light with a 2.5ah battery, but will keep running for another 5 minutes. When the light first turns red, stop and wait for a few minutes and it will be green again for a bit when you start again.
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(a)Typical Engineer

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This is for the 1st generation 20" mower, but should be similar for the other newer models.

Between the self closing door and the weight of the battery, I think the closed door contributes more to the awkwardness.  One solution would be to have a way to prop or hold the door open, which would then give you two hands to insert/remove the battery.  Actually here are three:

1) Use a stick to hold the door open.  You'll need to stay clear of the button so that you can operate it to release the battery, which is not a problem, just put the stick next to one of the door arms.  I think this is the best and easiest solution.

2) Use a clamp to hold the door open.  As some of these clamps require a lot of hand strength, I rated this as the 2nd best option.

3) Use gravity to hold the door open, e.g. insert remove your battery when the mower is in the stored position.  This would not work if you want to mow more than once.  I would rate this the last solution.





(Edited)
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Theresa Pipes

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Great ideas all, I will go and see the mower and check it out. I have a stick just like the one in the photo ditto for a box of clamps. Some of the easy ones may work. Thanks again!
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bloomz

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The smaller batteries are indeed easier to lift.


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(a)Typical Engineer

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True, but the single string batteries (e.g. 1P, or 2.0/.5) do not have enough power to run the high current draw tools, especially the mowers (not even the gen 1 600W 20" mower).  The mowers (and big tools) really need the 2nd/3rd strings of cells (e..g 2P = 4.0/5.0, or 3P = 7.5) to have enough performance, and the prevent early damage to the batteries.

Yes, the tool will limit it's current (via the built-in protection), but that's like a rev-limiter on a car, and if you drive your 4-cylinder around at red-line all the time, then you will eventually burn it out.
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Blue Angel, Champion

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A self supporting door has been on the wish list for quite some time now, and for just this reason. With the door constantly closing, dealing with the battery becomes a two-handed operation.
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Ken, Champion

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Keep in mind, the batteries do have a bit of a "handle" built into them. The center green part, seen with the No. 1 written on it in the photos above, is curved down and has a bit of a grip to it. Get your thumb over that and your fingers opposite it, and it makes a narrow grip to lift with one hand. I don't own a 7.5 Ah battery, but on all the smaller ones it makes picking them up one handed fairly easy.

I'm away from my house right now, but I can take a picture when I'm home later today.
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Ken, Champion

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Here are photos of the grip area on the front and rear of one of Ego's batteries:
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Egocentric

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The photos are worth 1000 words.  Nice job.  
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Ken, Champion

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Thanks! I should add, if someone doesn't have strong hands they probably still won't be able to lift one of the bigger batteries one-handed, but the built-in grip will at least help them get the battery far enough out of the mower to get a second hand on it.
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bloomz

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I SO appreciate my Luxury Problems these days......
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Amber F., Official EGO Rep

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Official Response
Theresa, which mower and batteries are you looking at? We can answer your question better once we have the specifics. In the meantime, here’s a video that night help address your concerns: https://youtu.be/FkLeSbSVnqY
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(a)Typical Engineer

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Amber, please feedback to Ego Engineering that users are requesting a battery bay door that stays open.  See Blue's comment above for additional details.

While the idea of a strap, or even the built in grip areas is good, it still requires moderate hand strength to be able to hold and manipulate the battery; which is Theresa's original concern.
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Amber F., Official EGO Rep

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As always, we continue to share the community’s suggestions and concerns with the team.
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Ken, Champion

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As long as I've owned my Ego mower I've wondered whether Ego's engineers have designed the battery doors not to stay open for a reason. All of the mowers and, I believe, the snow blower, are designed this way.
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(a)Typical Engineer

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Some engineering thoughts:
1) ease of manufacturing, no complexities to keep door open or closed (gravity)
2) keeping it closed reduces foreign material exposure to the battery


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Ken, Champion

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I'm thinking No.2. It would be easy enough to make the door so it opens a little past vertical so gravity would keep it open.
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Blue Angel, Champion

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I wondered the same, but then I thought why would they make the lid so it needed to be clicked shut? If you don't push it home you could mow with the lid partially open.

Other mowers use magnets to keep the battery lid closed. If they really were worried about debris I'd think that's a better strategy.

I would say my only two real complaints about the 20" mower are the front handle protruding and the battery lid that doesn't stay open. Both relatively minor concerns, but they keep an otherwise great mower from being darn near flawless.
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Egocentric

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I haven't had mine long enough too develop many complaints and I am still in the after glow of getting the sale price, but I must confess the mower is a bit of tank to push around compared to the junky 20 inch gas mowers I have always bought.  Much of my yard I can only use a weed trimmer on, Western PA is very hilly.  But in the "flat" part of my yard, this mower does exercise my bad knees and back.  The yard is too small for a self propelled.  That said, my shoulders do love the lack of a pull string, and the convenience is just fantastic compared to gas.  I am glad I held out for the 20 inch, the 21 in the store for 50 bucks less (before the sale) was tempting, but having pushed this thing around, I am glad I held out.  It is thirteen pounds less to push around.   The sale was some lovely icing on the cake.

So yes I like the mower, it hacks down my dandelions, weeds, and crabgrass quietly and good enough for me.  I just wished it was a little easier to push around, but I will get used to it.   

I am much more impressed with the line trimmer and chain saw than the mower.  Phenomenal.  That chain saw is actually a bit frightening.  You can get easily duped by its calm demeanor.  So quiet, so light, so little vibration, so seemingly gentle, and it chews through 8 inch ash like it was butter.  The thing will take your leg off in an instant, but it will be a real gentleman while doing it.  It kind of reminds of how one could almost get hypnotized with a timing light on a engine.  Don't cave in to the desire to touch the shaft, its spinning.     
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Jacob

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Wait what? Tank to push? The first gen 20" mower? Its got to be the lightest mower you have ever used.

Perhaps its cutting too low? When cutting low, there are straightener fins on the bottom to straighten the grass. If your cutting on 1 or 2, those fins may be dragging. Does it push super easy on a sidewalk or driveway and much harder in the grass?

If this is true, cut them fins off... they will eventually break off anyways, mine did.
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No its not the fins.  I had the height set at max for one pass.  Compared to a cheap MTD or Bolens 20 inch, this thing is a tank and my yard is anything but flat.   The real problem is that I am an old man with absolute junk for knees and no intestional fortitude to get them replaced.  The battery way outlasts me!   
(Edited)
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Jacob

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It should push waaaay easier than any gas non self propelled model. Do the wheels spin freely.
I understand your situation, however the comparison doesnt make sense to me.
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Wheels turn easy.  I have always bought the smallest lightest mower I could find because of my mountainous yard.  I have given up doing the hills with the push mower.  They are well beyond 15 degrees, but I used to cut them with a the push mower.  Can't do it any more, so I used the trimmer for the hills.  The back yard is "flatter," but still has a number grades on it, just not cliffs like the front. 

Next time you are in a Home Depot, take a look at the $140 MTD 20 inch.  

http://www.homedepot.com/p/MTD-MTD-20-in-125cc-OHV-Briggs-Stratton-Walk-Behind-Gas-Push-Mower-11A-02...

It is small by comparison.  The weight is 50 pounds compared to 56 for the Ego, but it seems far lighter to me and far easier to handle.   One thing that may make a difference is that I have always removed that protective dragging flap from the back.  I have left it on the Ego just in case I decide I want to return it.  Still I don't think that flap is making that much difference.  Then again maybe it is all in my head, but this thing definitely seems harder to push than that 20 Inch MTD.  Much easier to start though.  I just have to be a little smarter how I handle the grades.   
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Egocentric

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Oh the grass bag makes a difference too.  But even when empty, this thing seems like a Sherman tank compared to my old one.  
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Blue Angel, Champion

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Which model of the mower did you buy?
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Egocentric

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20 in non-self propelled, 5 aH battery and fast charger.  LM2002 was the kit designation.  The mower is LM2000-S.  The smallest Ego I could find with out going to the 4 aH battery (which would saved what a pound or two). 

When I ordered it (before the sale) the 20 inch was going for $499, internet only.  I could have picked up the 21 inch at the store for 50 bucks less and not bothered with an internet order.  As such, I paid $50 extra for 13 less pounds and waited a week for it to come in.   So I definitely wanted the smaller mower.   Well then the sale came along and I got $150 back.  Saved 100 on 13 pounds!   Very nice of Home Depot to honor the sale price when I had ordered it a week before.    
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(a)Typical Engineer

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HD honored the price adjustment because if they did not, you would just return the item, and re-purchase at the sale price, which actually costs Ego and HD more in the long run as they not have a used mower to either sell as open box, or send back to Ego (pretty sure they send all the returns back to Ego).
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(a)Typical Engineer

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@Egocentric, you might want to consider the SP model, either the Gen 2 21", or the Gen 3 20" brushless.  Yes it is going to cost more than the Gen 1 20", but if you're having trouble pushing it to cut at the highest setting, then the SP function can only help.
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Interesting... the original 20" mower is extremely light, and with its oversized rear wheels is very maneuverable. I can't remember anyone describing it as difficult.

BTW, the 4Ah and 5Ah batteries weight the same amount. They each have the same number of cells, but the cells in the 5Ah have 25% more capacity.
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Egocentric

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Well for most people and for myself 5 or 10 years ago, it would not be difficult to push.  But with my knees and back, yes it difficult.  Not impossible.  As I said I just have to get used to it, and perhaps use the trimmer in some of the steeper places.   The yard is too small for a self propelled mower.  The solution is not a different mower, but new knees.       
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(a)Typical Engineer

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Try pulling the mower backwards instead of pushing it forward; when I mow the lawn, half the time I'm pulling it backwards, especially in the tall over grown areas, and if the mower starts to blink orange, I'll stop forward progress rather than keep driving it forward and stalling it.
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Egocentric

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I used to cut grass that way, but pushing forward I get some support for my back and knees from the handle.  Pulling no support and rather painful.

I haven't used this mower enough to know the tricks of it, but I found with side discharge gas mowers that they cut more efficiently pushing forward.  My guess is that it is probably due to the shorter exit path for cuttings from  the leading edge of the blade.  Going forward the grass from the leading edge of blade (relative to the mower direction) only has to travel about 90 degrees to exit  the deck, where going backwards it has to travel 270 degrees.  Going backwards I would note a row of cuttings on the left side of the mower's path.  The mower would clog much easier and one had to proceed slower in high grass.

With a rear discharge this would seem to be even more pronounced having a forward exit path of 180 degrees, and backward approaching 360.  But remember I was buying the cheapest and junkiest mowers available for the light weight.  The below deck aerodynamics of such mowers is probably poor compared to the Ego.  
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Egocentric

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Oh, I have yet to get an orange light or even as much slow the mower down.  I had high grass but I knocked it down with the line trimmer, then did one pass with the deck set to the highest setting, then a second pass with the deck height on a mid setting where I will be using it in the future.  The mower handled it fine, and bagged all the grass.  I had nothing to rake.  I really have no complaints with the mower, but it does seem heavier and harder to maneuver than my old MTD.  Again it could be in my head, the Ego seems to be a much larger mower.  

I think my knees have hijacked this thread sufficiently.  
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Dave .

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A strap is an excellent idea!
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bloomz

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@egocentric...just an opinion, yeah Home Depot was "nice" but doesn't that really mean "Smart"?
Here's a recent experience I wrote a review about:

----------------------------------------------------------------------

We started looking at Home Depot, then I decided I would support a local business by going to Stover.

Turns out to be a huge mistake. The washing machine we bought my wife absolutely hates, and has complained about it every time she uses it. "See, look at this"

At 2 weeks into owning this dog, I went into the store and spoke with them about this, and asked if I could return it, and buy a higher priced model. I was told no. I wasn't asking for my money back (tho I could have so easily gotten a FULL refund from Home Depot had I bought there even 6 months later), but I just wanted credit on a higher priced model.

The answer was no, we don't do any returns. (read as: you're stuck with it)

So I don't know how many years I get to hear how much that machine sucks, thanks to their lack of decent service.

Huge mistake I made buying there. Better keep this in mind if you decide to "buy local".

I don't particularly like supporting big box stores, but the above experience shows me why they are killing smaller stores.

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Egocentric

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Well, as everyone is noting, Home Depot, a huge and heartless corporation does nothing because they are nice.  Poor choice of words on my part.  So I concede smart is a much better term.   That not withstanding, I appreciated getting the sale price with no BS and the minimal of calls.  They didn't do anything to hurt their future business with me.  
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bloomz

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I just came from HD where I decided to ask if there was anything in their computer about a soon to be released High Lift Blade, so the guy took me to the shelf where I told him I know 110% it was not there, then said if it's not available that means its not available.

A real DUH moment.

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Egocentric

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Win some, lose some!   Ain't there, so it ain't available.  Computer inventory systems are over rated anyhow.  
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Blue Angel, Champion

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I do believe Ron Swanson has some advice for handling big box store employees:

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szwoopp, Champion

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Ron Swanson is the BEST
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Blue Angel, Champion

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Isn't he though! :-)
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Theresa Pipes

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OK all, I bought the mower and have had no problems because I can use a stick to keep the door open and use both hands, also garden gloves have some grip as well. It is a big heavy mower but the controls for the speed are brilliant, I love the way I can turn it off when coming into a hard turn and then get it back on for mowing the up the hill or straight away. Thanks again for all the ideas. I am using the big battery that came with the self propel. It is a very long mower which makes it hard in a tight corner, but I am really happy with it. Much easier than my old Toro self propel.
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(a)Typical Engineer

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Sometimes the simplest solutions are the best!

@Amber, please feedback to the Ego Design/Engineering Team.
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Egocentric

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Theresa, good luck with your new mower and I am glad the battery concern worked out good for you.  
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bloomz

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This thread is the best example of a First World Problem I've seen in at least months.....

Have I mentioned my fish pond leaks???  What can I do about that?

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Blue Angel, Champion

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Not sure if you read through all the comments or not, but the OP is a 68 year old woman with smaller hands. She also says her hands are weak, so a battery lid that stayed open would be a big benefit for her. ;-)

It may be a first world problem for most of us, true, but I liken it to a car company deleting the prop rod then looking at you funny because you don't want to hold the hood open with your head while you check your oil. :-)
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(a)Typical Engineer

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Or when the gas shocks on your trunk stop working, and you have to use one hand to hold the trunk open, while you load with the other...
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Blue Angel, Champion

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Exactly!
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TK

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Blue Angel,  great comment. I fully agree. Easy fix for customer satisfaction. One notch from being rude to a person that some hand issues..
(Edited)
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Egocentric

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When you get older First World Problems become somewhat more meaningful.  
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Oregon Mike, Champion

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Theresa, glad you took a chance and bought it. As you have discovered, you can handle the battery and mower so that's great. Seems like it's going to work out for you just fine.
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Amber F., Official EGO Rep

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Thank you for taking the time to share your experience and insights. We continue to relay your ideas and feedback.  

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