First Big Snowstorm

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  • Updated 3 weeks ago
So we finally got our "first" Big Snowstorm / Blizzard in Chicago on Sunday, with an accumulation of around 13" of wet, heavy slushy snow.  With my new EGO snow blower, I went out this morning to put this machine to the test.  Since I only have (1) 5.0 Ah and (3) 2.5 Ah batteries, I had to use a combination of (5.0 + 2.5) for this job.

As you can see below, I got through roughly 85% of the driveway (3 car) before running out of juice.  Overall, the snow blower did a fantastic job chewing up the snow and throwing it out the chute.  Because it was wet & heavy slushy snow, the throwing distance was around 15' max - which is to be expected.  Most of the time, I used the "slowest" auger setting, until I came across the thickest part of the snow at the end of the driveway.  When I set the auger speed to "medium," it did the trick in clearing the snow.

Overall, I was pleased with the performance of this snow blower.  We don't normally get this type of snow often here in the midwest, but glad to see this machine can handle the job!








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David HD, Champion

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Posted 3 weeks ago

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szwoopp, Champion

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I am in the Chicago area as well.  That was a heck of a lot of really wet and heavy snow.   I should have gone out last night and cleared away the first half of it, but I was lazy and had to deal with the entire 11" that dropped at my house.  The Ego blower did a great job.

Although it did bog down and have some trouble in spots where snow was thrown on top of snow due to bushes and buildings forcing such a throwing pattern it powered through those areas by using a double pass (one pass with the blower tiled up off the ground and a second pass with the blower fully scraping the driveway) or with the use of taking a half pass and thus not overloading the intake chute.  But it is doing the job I expect it to and then some.  You can't expect the blower to take in more snow than the opening at the mouth.  And I heard plenty of sputtering from neighbors gas blowers (in addition to smelling their fumes) as they also struggled with the extremely wet snow.

Looking forward to the next more normal snow fall when the Ego will just eat thru 100% of it with no special maneuvers. This is my second year, so I know exactly how well this machine works on the more typical Chicago snow falls.
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Bill Menzel

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Really!!!!!!  I have an Ego Snow Blower and a Cub Cadet HD 26 inch "3 stage" gasoline snow blower.  There is no comparison.  I live in upstate New York, southeast of Lake Ontario (Lake Effect snow).  The Ego snow blower does a great job on light fluffy snow and not so great on heavy wet snow.  No single stage blower does, gas or cordless.  Before you make any remarks, "Google" Cub Cadet 3 stage snow blower and also the you tube videos on these snow blowers.  I constantly get heavy wet snow stuck in my Ego snow blower's chute.  I wouldn't have spent over $1,500 for the Cub Cadet if my Ego snow blower was doing what you guys are saying.  Don't get me wrong, I love Ego products, especially my dual battery self-propelled lawn mower, but you have to have the right tool for the right situation, otherwise all people would need to have is the Ego snow blower.  Ego would put all those other companies out of business.
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szwoopp, Champion

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Bill, Not saying my Ego does the same job as your Cub Cadet.  2 stage and "3 stage" blowers certainly can handle much bigger jobs.  As I said look at the mouth if you want to see what you blower can handle.  As I was driving to work I drove by a guy with a 2 stage and he certainly was doing a lot less work and the blower a lot more than my morning snow removal, but that is a giant machine.  I would want it.  Not sure what he does when there are 2" snow.

That said my blower worked great just as I reported.  Bogged down at times but kept on working just had to back off and come at the snow again.  More work than a 2 stage - sure when there are 11" of snow.  I think the 2 stage would be more work when there are 2" of snow etc.

Different tools for different jobs. 
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David HD, Champion

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Bill, I am not an expert in snow and can only speak to what I have here in Chicago.  That said; my snow blower did not suffer from clearing the snow this morning.  Similarly to Szwoopp, there were two instances where I had to go over the "thick" snow twice to clear it.  But outside of those two instances, I did not have any problems clearing the driveway (as per the pictures).  I am certain your Cub Cadet is a BEAUTIFUL MACHINE that can handle many "tough" snow conditions.  My post was about my driveway, and not a "put down" on anyone else's snow blowers.  And yes, I am an EGO consumer just like everyone else here, I don't work for EGO or advertise for them ... :-)
(Edited)
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Michael Millan

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Thank you for echoing my results! I live in up state New York, where we received (in the area we live in) about 8 inches of heavy wet snow. The Ego snow blower did a very good job in my driveway which measures about 100 feet by 20 feet. I was able to clear 2/3 of the driveway, then plugged in two additional Ego batteries to finish the job. I do have a Husquevarna two stage gas powered snow blower which works well, but if I can avoid using it to use the Ego snow blower I will.
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DHD, glad to see it worked for you! So did you use the 5+2.5 and then the two remaining 2.5’s to finish up? If so, any large power difference between the two combinations?
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David HD, Champion

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Hey Blue, I recharged my 5.0 and 2.5 and went inside to have breakfast.  After about 40 minutes, I went back out to finish the job.  Given the snow condition (wet & heavy), I did not want to chance it on my (2) 2.5 Ah.  The next time we have "lighter" snow, I will try that combination (2) 2.5 Ah ... :-)
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szwoopp, Champion

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My power is out so no recharging for me.  I used 5 + 5 and then 5 + 7.5  Which lasted a little over an hour total, but I pushed them hard.  They usually last twice that long with ordinary snow falls.
Thankfully I charged them all last night,
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Blue Angel, Champion

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Sounds like a good plan!
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Michael G

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I'm in the burbs SW of Chicago and we only had an inch or so on the drive. I tried an EGO blower but my concrete drive and sidewalks constantly made the blower come to an abrupt stop that scared the Dickens out of me. I wanted to be all gas-less but I ended up with a Toro. 

David - are you sure that is 13" of snow (doesn't look like much more than 4" from the photos).
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David HD, Champion

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Hey Michael, yes it was around 13". I used my wide angle lense on my LG V30 so it distorted the picture somewhat.
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Bill Menzel

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I understand you guys are happy with your snow blower.  Remember, I have the same snow blower with two 7.5 ah batteries.  I am just going on my own experience, because I can compare both of them.  But I am glad that you guys can go through any type of snow, I just couldn't.
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Bryan

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It sort of looks like there was some compacting of the wet snow as the day went. So even if that isn't 13" of snow depth in the pics...that's still a lot of heavy wet snow there that had to be shoveled. I still haven't used my EGO snow blower yet...it must be a snow repellent for my part of South Dakota.
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Bill Menzel

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Below is some information on different types of snow blowers and their capability.

Electric

Electric snow blowers are capable of clearing light snow (less than 12 inches) from sidewalks and small driveways. These extremely lightweight machines are commonly used on decks and steps where larger gas-powered models simply don’t fit.

Electric snow blowers are virtually maintenance-free and eliminate the need for oil changes or fill-ups. All you need is a cold weather extension cord and an electrical outlet and you'll be clearing your driveway in seconds.

 

Single-Stage

In very basic terms, these gas-powered single-stage snow blowers only throw the snow once with an auger that scoops up the snow and throws it out the chute. These gas-powered units are the lightest, smallest, and easiest to handle.

 

They have some basic features and accessories available and are great for suburban areas that get moderate snowfall. If you don't mind clearing your driveway multiple times during a snowstorm, this price point might be great for you.

Since the auger paddles actually make contact with the ground, you should not use a single stage snow thrower on gravel surfaces, or you'll risk injury to others or damage to your driveway.

Though single-stage snow blower models vary across brands, most are typically 18-22 inches wide and meant to handle snowfalls up to 8-12 inches. The most limiting factor, however, is their height—not the width. If you’re frequently battling 12-inch snow drifts, a single-stage snow blower won't be powerful enough; you'll need a 2 or 3-stage instead.

 

 Two-Stage

Two-stage snow blowers, on the other hand, outperform both electric and single-stage throwers in every category. These powerful machines can handle upwards of 18+ inches of snow with ease, and their heavier, sturdier design helps you tackle deep and heavy snow without slowing down.

 The distinct difference is that these blowers throw the snow twice. First, a metal auger scoops up the snow and ice. Then, a high-speed impeller throws it out through the discharge chute to keep the snow moving and prevent clogging the intake bucket.

The auger on a two-stage snow blower doesn't touch the ground, so they can be used on gravel and concrete. Plus, they feature taller buckets capable of tearing through the snow drifts and pile-ups at the end of your driveway or mailbox.

If you need to clear large, deep expanses of snow, you’ll appreciate the wider and more powerful two-stage snowblower.

 

Three-Stage

Three-stage snow blowers are the most powerful and efficient snow blowers on the market. First, two metal augers scoop up the snow and ice. Then they move it toward the center of the unit where an accelerator chops and pushes the snow through the impeller, launching it out of the chute at high speed.

These blowers have all of the features you need to make sure your time spent removing snow isn't just comfortable, but also easy. Some popular features on these models can include self-propelled wheels, heated grips, and single-press chute control.If a snow plow leaves frozen, compacted walls of snow at the end of your driveway,

Three-stage machines also have a slow turning auger that gathers snow and moves it toward the center of the housing. However, the second-stage auger is designed to propel the snow into the impeller at a faster rate than a typical two-stage machine. So a three-stage snow blower can move more snow and do it in record time. In fact, a three-stage snow blower can remove heavy snow almost 50% faster than the same size two-stage machine. Three-stage snow blowers are designed for heavy snowfall depths up to 18 in. on driveways up to 3 cars wide x 4 cars long.this machine will plow through 20+ inches high heaps while launching it 50 feet away


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Michael Cortopassi

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Well, I *was* really happy with the blower, it cleaned all the slushy 13" (Arlington Hts, IL) this morning, but came back tonight to finish the plow stuff at the end of the drive and got a overload flashing light.  Removed/replaced batteries, made sure paddle turned freely, same thing, over and over.  Runs for 5 seconds and stops with the blinking.  Now I get to find out how customer service is.
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Blue Angel, Champion

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If you are actually overloading it, maybe it’s just operating as designed? If you left the plow pile all day and it solidified slightly with a temperature drop, it might be difficult for the paddles to cut into the snow/ice.

If the light is blinking and there’s no load on the machine, then yes there’s definitely something wrong! If you bought it less than 90 days ago you can exchange it at Home Depot for a new one. That will be a much quicker process than having it repaired. If you bought it with the Home Depot credit card you have an entire year to exchange it.
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Michael Cortopassi

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No load blinking, bought last year. So I expect that is operating as expected, except doesn't reset itself, or whatever sensor detects an overload gets damaged
(Edited)
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Ken, Champion

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I apologize for the snow. We were supposed to take some of that off your hands in Des Moines, but it slid about 5 miles to the south and missed us completely. Then it slid to the north and slammed Chicago.

I didn't get so much as a flake at my house. And I had my batteries charged, ready to try out the snow blower. I'm actually a little disappointed.
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szwoopp, Champion

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You sound like me last year when I first got the snow blower. Couldn’t decide if I was happy or sad when a storm missed us.
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Michael Millan

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Ten four
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Michael Cortopassi

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Well, less that thrilled with customer support.  All indications when I registered the products, which I did, was that no receipt was needed.  This blower was from my Dad, who bought it a couple years ago but since has changed to a snowplow service (he is 86).  I had no receipt, and the registration/warranty allowed me to register it as coming from a relative.  Now today, when i needed service, I cannot get warranty coverage except under a one time exception, and only if I bring into Home Depot repair, which could potentially take 6-8 weeks.  Anyone know of any self fixing options for this overload condition?  I am an electrical engineer and work with PC board and components on a daily basis.  Thanks.