Extension pole for tree trimmer

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Why doesn't EGO offer an eight or nine or ten foot extension pole for its tree saw?  A 31 inch extension just isn't adequate.  Many of your competitors offer such an extension.
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buba46

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Posted 1 year ago

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szwoopp, Champion

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Official Response
The powerhead and pole saw measure 91" 

The extension adds 31"

Total 122" or 10 feet. 

Based on reports of users it can become difficult to use at this length unless using it almost completely vertical.  Those that have added a second extension (not recommended by the manufacturer) state the same issues with ability to handle the tool compound as it length grows.

So, they do offer a 10 foot total length pole saw and probably do not offer any more as its safety and usability are questionable.

(Edited)
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Blue Angel, Champion

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Agreed. I use both the pole saw and hedge trimmer attachments with the extension and the mass gets to you quickly.

I’m 6ft tall, 180 lbs and in pretty good shape, and it’s a workout to use the hedge trimmer over the top of our small willow tree.

The pole saw is a little lighter, but can require more input force from the operator. You never should be using it truly vertical... you don’t want to be standing below the branch you’re cutting.

Perhaps a smaller/lighter 6” pole saw would allow comfortable use at longer extensions? The laws of physics are unrelenting. :-)
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szwoopp, Champion

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"You never should be using it truly vertical... you don’t want to be standing below the branch you’re cutting."

But it makes it much easier to catch the falling branch in my teeth.  And if the branch is not falling at the proper angle my roller skates allow for quick movement away from the area of impact.
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Blue Angel, Champion

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szwoopp doing yard work:

(Edited)
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Paul Christenson

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One reason the EGO units total out around 10 ft...:)


Power Lines Carrying Under 150 Volts

There's a specific rule for power lines and conductors where the voltage does not exceed 150 volts to ground. The required minimum clearance is 10 feet above finished grade or sidewalks, or from any platform or projection from which the lines might be reached (and are accessible to pedestrians only). This distance is regarded as safe to allow for the passage of pedestrians even while carrying tools or other items. 

Power Lines Carrying 300–600 Volts

For power lines not exceeding 600 volts over residential property, including driveways and other areas of non-commercial traffic, the minimum required overhead clearance is 12 feet. The same requirement applies to lines 600 volts or less over commercial areas that are not subject to truck traffic.


For power lines not exceeding 600 volts in commercial areas, the minimum overhead clearance is 18 feet for the following locations:

  • Alleys
  • Public streets
  • Non-residential driveways
  • Roadways and parking areas subject to truck traffic
  • Other areas subject to vehicle traffic (such as farm equipment, forestry operations, etc.)

Remember, just because power lines are strung high enough in normal conditions, icy conditions and downed tree limbs can bring power lines dangerously close, so beware!


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Alice Simpson

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Something else to consider:  having a Plan B for when the saw binds in the limb you're cutting directly over your head, which can happen easily.  Even if you're off to one side, the saw can bind if the limb you're cutting twists as it falls or the ends of the branch hit other branches so that the limb cannot fall freely.  I've sometimes had to climb up on the loader of the tractor with a regular chain saw, or use a manual pole saw, to free a stuck pole chain saw.  I hate to think what would happen with a 10 ft extension if the saw got stuck in the limb.  You'd be hiring a professional tree company to get your saw back.  And for that kind of expense, you could have bought several pole saws.  

As for cutting limbs directly overhead, after a 2" branch fell on top of my head and caused a deep gash that bled profusely, I now wear a helmet when using the pole saw.  The next time I used it, a branch fell on my hand, causing the arthritis in my thumb to flare up for days.  So now I wear gloves, too, not that they would help much.  Lastly, don't forgot the goggles for when the sawdust falls in your eyes.  I'm a risk taker and slow learner, so probably not a good match for any kind of power equipment.  I'm just saying things can go wrong.  Plan ahead.