EGO 56 volt 16" chainsaw running on 2.0 and 2.5 Ah battery vs 5.0 Ah

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Just bought an EGO 56 volt 16" chainsaw with the 5.0 Ah battery, which I am itching to saw through a pile of Pecan wood for my smoker, but wanting some back up spare batteries to keep around. My question is how much slower/worse will my chainsaw perform on the 2.0 and 2.5 Ah batteries?
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Joshua Leifeste

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Posted 3 years ago

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Blue Angel, Champion

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The original 14" chainsaw came with the 2Ah battery, so it definitely has enough power to cut. I would think you won't really notice much of a difference unless you're really leaning on it, it I have no direct experience with the saw so I can't say for sure.

You could look up old reviews for the 14" saw, too. :-)
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Jacob

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He got the 16" saw. The minimum battery i would recommend is the 4 ah. The motor limits its amp draw based on the battery installed.
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Dave .

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I have the 14".   It stops a  lot when using 2.0 or 2.5 batteries--the least bit of strain causes the motor to stop.  You have to release the power button and re-engage it to restart the motor.  When I find that happening, I grab the 7.5 out of my mower to keep from cursing Ego over this problem.
(Edited)
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Dave .

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When anyone presumes to know how my particular unit is acting, as opposed to some other unit, we are "discussing" issues with no resolution.   Not every copy of an item acts the same as others.  MIne shuts down far too easily, yet it works great if it has the 7.5 battery installed.  ( I have no batteries between 2.5 and 7.5)
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Blue Angel, Champion

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Dave, what other tools do you use the 2Ah battery with? Wondering if there might be an issue with the battery?
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Blue Angel, Champion

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Dave, this is the review breakdown for the 14" chainsaw on Home Depot. I read through the 1 star reviews and none mention a lack of power. Perhaps there's something wrong with yours?

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Jonathan Van Ryzin

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Get the 5.0 or higher. It will cut out mid through a cut if you push it.
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Dave .

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I have at least 3 of the 2.0 batteries.  They even work fine in the 21SP mower (I use one for a while when I deplete the 7.5).
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(a)Typical Engineer

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Will it run on the 1P batteries (2.0/2.5), yes.  Is it worse than the 2P (4.0/5.) or 3P (7.5), yes, but not for the reason you think.  Drawing a high amount of current from a 1P battery will not only use it up faster, it will also reduce the life of the battery.  Sure the chainsaw has built in protection to either run the saw at a lower power, and it is doing that to protect the battery since high current draw is what kills lithium cells the quickest.

Here's another analogy; the 1P is like a 4-cylinder engine, the 2P is like a 6-cylinder, and the 3P is like an 8-cyinder.  If they are all cruising down the highway at 60 mph, they are all doing the same work, but the 4-cyl is working twice as hard as the 8-cyl.  Over time, the 4-cylinder will likely wear out quicker than the larger engines.  That's a really crude analogy by the way.
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Blue Angel, Champion

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ATE, high current draw does shorten the life of lithium cells, but I was always under the impression that the main reason for the damage was actually the heat generated, not the actual current draw (same for discharging).

Are you aware of any studies done where the cells were cooled while being tested? All the life expectancy curves I've seen for cells have been done with the bare cell sitting in open air, no attempt to cool or manage temperature rise. This is where I believe Ego's Phase Change cell wraps come in, limiting the peak cell temps under high discharge and therefore dramatically extending battery life compared to a non thermally managed cell under the same conditions.

Oh, and the analogy would be better if it was a 4cyl, an 8cyl and a 12cyl. ;-)
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Joshua Leifeste

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Thanks guys, I decided to forgo buying the 2.0 and 2.5 batteries and will look for a good deal on a 4.0 or 5.0 battery next. Should I worry about getting the fast charge system or just wait while my std charger slow charges those larger batteries? Seems there is a debate on what is best for this type of battery for longevity reasons.
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Blue Angel, Champion

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David, I think that only applies to their Gift Guide Items, no?
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David HD, Champion

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Blue, you are correct - my bad!
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David Cline

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They do have pretty regular sales though, so if you keep an eye out for one you should be able to get 15-20% off their (somewhat inflated) regular prices.

A few times per year you can get as much as 25-30% off, which makes for some pretty impressive deals—possibly the cheapest you can get Ego products from an authorized retailer.
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Joshua Leifeste

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Thanks everyone for taking time to respond to my posts. This is one of the reasons I purchased this unit vs other options.
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Troutboy

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I just bought the 14 inch, no batteries, used my lawn mower battery, the big boy. I cut down several medium to large trees, limbed them, cut into logs and it worked great. Never stalled, never ran out of power cutting on and off for three hours. Trees were aspens , so they got thinner at top and were 12-13 inches at base.
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Michael Slama

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I was thinking about getting a 5.0 battery for my 16" chainsaw, but the Home Depot site says the 5.0 and the 7.5 are no longer available. What gives?
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Blue Angel, Champion

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Michael, I'm seeing both batteries in stock. Do you happen to live in Alaska? If so, HD will not ship batteries there.
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Michael Slama

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I'm in Houston. There must have been a glitch on their website yesterday because they're all showing up now. Thanks for checking!
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Michael Slama

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I can't find any batteries locally though beside the 2.0 battery, but it's hard to use the Home Depot website because searching for "available today for pickup" only works with the store you've chosen as your primary store. IOW, I have to choose store after store after store to see if one might have it in stock. Sigh.
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Erik

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Michael you can view other stores inventory easy see "check other stores inventory" in orange, click that.
(Edited)
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David HD, Champion

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Michael, my local HD has both the 14" & 16" available for Free In Store Pickup.  It could be that your "local" HD is out of stock.

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Michael Slama

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I have the 16" chainsaw but I'm looking for an extra battery.
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matt.mackinnon

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I have given it a try and it worked fine for me with the wood that I was cutting.  It was some crab apple and 4 - 5" dia branches that I was cutting.  I think you have to put everything into some perspective when you ask the question.

I am sure that there is reduced power with the smaller batteries.  try and fall a 26" dia hard maple tree and it's going to have far more issues with a smaller battery.  But I am sure that if you are trying to lop off some limbs from the same tree that are 1/3 that size and it will do it without complaining. 

I have to crack a smile when you get both sides talking about chainsaws.  There are the serious professionals that harp on the side that their gas powered saw was much better and could saw for the whole day without any issue falling giant trees.  Not once mentioning they had to keep refilling the tank, adding oil and sharpening the blades.  Also no mention as to the size, make, model or cost of the saw they are using to compare.

EGO makes products for general home users and size them to fit in that market space.  I don't know too many home owners who chop down multiple trees every day that are of a large size.   I bought mine as we have had in past ice storms that tend to bring down branches and I want a way to clear up after that next storm and make my life easier.   I also do woodworking and having a handy chainsaw to prep chuncks of wood for turning on a lathe is a real handy tool.  EGO fit the bill perfectly without the mess and bother of a gas powered chainsaw.  with either the 2.5Ah or 5.0Ah battery it does a great job.  But keep in mind what I am using it for when you read the comment claim
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Troutboy

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I think there is some misinformation on this thread. When it comes to batteries, especially these lithiums, the ampHr ratings have nothing to do with power and how hard they will work. Amphr rating only has to do with how long the batteries will last at a specific draw before running out of juice. So the larger amphr will run for a longer time. I haven't looked at the saw draw in particular. But as an illustration. If you are in the same cutting situation, a 5 ahr battery can cut for twice as long as a 2.5 Ahr battery. But the power to drive the saw will be the same. It only has to do with how much capacity the battery can store, not how much power it delivers.

I have now used my 2.0 amphr battery, up to my 7.5 amphr and the power is the same, the 2.0 just does not last very long while cutting, but does just as fine as the 7.5 while,it lasts.
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Troutboy

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Thanks Matt,  I'm not a lithium battery expert, my battery experience is in Solar systems and electrical engineering, mostly wet cells.  What you makes sense to me in terms of health and life of a battery.  But in terms of what a battery does, it purely stores energy.  The motor dictates and calls for the power or amp draw,  and the battery can only then give what the motto calls for.

What does thermal throttling in this case due? I still don't understand how this impacts the motor being able to do the work.  Does this throttling act like a choke on battery output? thanks for helping me understand....
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matt.mackinnon

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It is pretty much that.  There are logic boards inside the battery that monitor the temp of the battery and will control the flow to power out the battery.  in smaller tools like a blower, hedge trimmer, string trimmer, the motor is sort of free spinning and small enough to never really exceed the amp draw on any of the batteries.

When you get into the larger tools and tools that are load based such as the mower, snow blower, chainsaw then you will have additional communication between the sensor logic board that controls the motor, and the battery.

Now I believe that EGO has quite an ingenious deisgn in the battery packs as they have a gel wrapper around the cell clusters that is thermally activated.  as the battery gets hotter it changes physical state that can be used by the logic in the battery/tool.  They can do things like ramp up a fan to cool the battery pulling more air in over the cells.  In the chainsaw it can sense the temp change in the battery and lower the current pull that the motor has on the battery.  Combine this with feedback from the motor to sense stall situations, the chainsaw unit can protect itself and simply cut off the battery so you don't burn out the motor if the current demand exceeds the batteries ability to deliver.

Hence that is why they say that you get more power from a 2p (4.0 or 5.0Ah) or larger battery on the chainsaw as it can regulate the temp of the cells better giving the motor more available current to take on more work before reaching a stall condition.
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(a)Typical Engineer

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Rich, I don't think what you've stated is correct; the 3P (7.5) battery has 3x more power available than the 1P (2.5) battery.  Power is defined as volts x current (amps) = power (watts).  When the chainsaw requests the power, the 1P will have 140W/H (56v x 2.5AH) available; and the 3P will deliver 420 W/H (56v x 7.5AH) [W/H = watts per hour].  Now where the chainsaw can use all that power is another story; the newer 16" has a slightly higher Watt motor compared to the 14" (gen 2, and more than the 14" gen 1).

Here's another example; you have a power tool, you plug it into a 15A outlet, and if you drive it too hard, it will trip the circuit breaker, because the current draw exceeded the 15A safety cut off point.  So you'd plug it into a 20A or 30A circuit, at which point the internal breaker would have to provide the overload protection.

I have observed this exact same performance on a 20" mower; when I run it on a single 2.5AH battery, and go over very thick grass, it will go orange then cut off quite often.  When I run it on the 5.0 AH battery, it will blink every so often, and hardly ever cuts out.
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Troutboy

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Thanks Matt!  That is pretty cool, smart battery... Learn something new every day!
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Blue Angel, Champion

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To add to what's been said, every battery experiences a voltage drop when you apply a load. Since the larger batteries have two or three parallel strings of cells to provide power with, the voltage drop can be much less than with the single string 1P batteries.

I believe the tools go into overload when the battery voltage under load drops below some predetermined setpoint, so the 2P and 3P batteries will be able to maintain voltage above that setpoint for a greater percentage of their discharge capacity. This would mean for a given load (say a heavy chainsaw cut), the larger batteries would be able to keep the cut going far deeper into their discharge capacity than the smaller batteries could. So a 2Ah battery might go into overload with 75% of its capacity remaining, while the 4Ah might stay out of overload until it's down to 40% (just examples).
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Bob

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This reply was created from a merged topic originally titled Does anyone know if the 16" chainsaw can be used with the 2.5 amp battery or does....

Chainsaw
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matt.mackinnon

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yes it can, but you give up some power in the saw.  The EGO chainsaw's detect the size of the battery and if you use the larger battery it can support more power to the motor and you get more cutting torque at the blade.

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