Does Snowblower with 2 - 7.5 AH batteries have more power to clear heavier snow than 2-5.0 AH? or just for longer duration?

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Does Snowblower with 2 - 7.5 AH batteries have more power to clear more deeper and heavier snow than with 2-5.0 AH batteries? 
What are the advantages of going with the 2-7.5 AH kit than with 2-5.0 AH kit other than just duration?
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Taurean17

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Posted 3 years ago

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Blue Angel, Champion

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I posted my thoughts about that same question in this other conversation:

https://community.egopowerplus.com/eg...
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matt.mackinnon

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I think that the answer will be a No and Yes.

The motor itself cannot pull more energy out of a 7.5 AH battery than it can out of a 5.0 AH.  So for that part of the question the answer is No.

However, as you use the snow blower you are going to generate heat inside the battery, and the circuits are designed to protect the battery from wear due to overheating.  As a 7.5 AH battery has more cell packs, it pulls less power per each cell pack to provide the same wattage output.  So the battery can run cooler so in the case of heavier snow you will get a longer run time at full power before the motor scales back to protect the battery.  So that could be a Yes.

My take on it.
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Blue Angel, Champion

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Matt, the way I understand these modern PWM controls is, the more load they're placed under the more current the controls pull from the battery to keep the speed constant. When they get to 100% duty cycle they're basically running wide open.

At that point, the voltage drop of the battery under load will determine how powerful the machine is.

With a smaller battery the voltage drop and/or current draw may be excessive, triggering the controller to stop increasing power before 100% duty cycle is reached. This sounds like it may be the case when using the 1P batteries (2Ah and 2.5Ah), and why Ego recommends using 2P (4Ah and 5Ah) batteries to ensure maximum performance.

Moving from 2P to 3P (7.5Ah) batteries, since there are 50% more cells to draw from the voltage drop under load will be less. This is my theory, not Ego's, as to why there could potentially be a power advantage with the larger batteries. :-)

Having said that, the snow blower is rated at 2000W, or 1000W per installed battery, or about 20A per battery. In the 2P batteries this translates to about 10A per string of cells, and about 6.7A per string in the 3P 7.5Ah battery.

The cells used in these batteries are rated up to 20A continuous output, so I doubt the voltage drop difference between 10A and 6.7A is much to worry about. You'd probably need to pay very close attention while doing side by side performance tests to ever see the difference, and that's even assuming my theories about how the controller works are correct. :-P
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matt.mackinnon

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Moving from 2P to 3P (7.5Ah) batteries, since there are 50% more cells to draw from the voltage drop under load will be less. This is my theory, not Ego's, as to why there could potentially be a power advantage with the larger batteries. :-)
In the EGO motor world, you have two limiting factors.  The size of the power source as you have described above, and the size of the motor.  As the motor has to dissipate heat as well, you simply cannot ram more current through the windings on the motor to get more power as they would melt.  It battery might support it, but without an equally larger motor.

Now a DC motor by most designs have far more torque than an AC motor.  That is perfect of the use of snow removal as it's not the speed of the paddle that you need, but it's ability to keep turning under load.  As such, you will find that they are using a totally different type of motor in the blower than they are inside the mower where speed really is king and torque is enough to turn the blade without stalling.
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Taurean17

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Thanks for your replies Matt and Blue Angel !
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matt.mackinnon

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Your welcome.  It is when people ask questions that all of us learn
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BeeMan458

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Some battery designs can pull more energy out than other designs.  Check out 18650 batteries if wanting more information.
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Taurean17

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Does anyone know if there is a chance that HomeDepot will sell this new combo (with 2-7.5 AH) in stores also or would it be online-only item (like it is now) in the near future too?
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Devenie Corliss

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I doubt HD will carry the 7.5 in stores but they do offer free shipping and you can return at a store.
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Ken, Champion

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I agree with Devenie. A lot of Home Depots aren't carrying the snowblower in store at all (only one of the five HDs in my area carry it). I doubt they'd stock two different kits. But they're easy enough to order for home delivery or in-store pickup. I had to do that to get Ego's 15-inch string trimmer and it was painless.
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David HD, Champion

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My local HD actually have (5) in stock with the 5.0 Ah battery kit, but the 7.5 Ah and No Battery Kit, they will ship to store or home, but not available in store.
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Blue Angel, Champion

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I believe Jennifer confirmed the 15Ah snowblower kit will be an online-only item.
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Jennifer VandeWater, Community Manager

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That is correct.
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Taurean17

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Thank you all for your replies
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Blue Angel, Champion

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No problem!