Converting Watt Hours to Amp Hours.

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Info needed to determine Amp Hour rating of Ego Nexus Powerstation.
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George C. Lutch

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Posted 3 months ago

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szwoopp, Champion

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Official Response
Not sure what you are asking.  The Amp hours of the power station will depend on the batteries you are using.
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William

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I’m not quite sure I understand the question. Basically with 4 x 7.5 AH battery the power station can supply about 1700w for one hour. This is in an ideal world. If you lower the load the batteries will last longer. Hope this helps.
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George C. Lutch

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Most of my equipment has an amp rating not a watt rating and I was looking for a way to judge the capabilities of the Nexus in AH's.  I use 4 x 7.5AH batteries.
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Dave .

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summetj

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A * Volts = Watts
AH * Volts = Watt / Hours

7.5 AH * 56 V = 420 Watt Hours
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William

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Maybe it would be better if you could give an example of what equipment you would like to run on the Nexus. Also specify the amp rating and maybe I could try to calculate it as an example for you to use.
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max power

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watts = volts times amps
similarly watt-hours is volts times amp-hours

the ego batteries are 56V and have their amp-hour rating on the side (for example 7.5 Ah, 5.0 Ah, 2.5 Ah)

so one 7.5 Ah Ego battery is equivalent to ...

56 Volts * 7.5 Amp-hours = 420 Watt-hours

My configuration is 2 7.5Ah batteries plus two extra batteries from a mower (4 Ah) and a string trimmer (2 Ah). So the total watt-hour capacity of my system is ...

56 Volts * (7.5 + 7.5 + 4 + 2)Ah =
56 Volts * 21 Amp-hours =
1176 Watt-hours

You can work from the AC side too. If you have a device that draws 5 Amps on a 120V circuit, that's 120V * 5A = 600 watts. for two hours of continuous use that would consume 2h * 600W or 1200Watt-hours of electricity. My almost 1200Wh setup would be almost enough to run that load for 2 hours (maybe 1h45 with losses due to the conversion of 56V DC to 120V AC)