Condition of the Mower Blade Right Out of the Box

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About a week ago I took delivery of the new 21 SP mower.  I was showing it off to someone yesterday and he commented, "You better sharpen the blade."  Never having dealt with this before I had no idea about "blade sharpness.  I'm attaching a picture I took and wonder if folks could comment on it.  I've not yet done the first cut, but that will have to happen this week.  It seems like the blade could cut grass but I'm sure I'd never cut my finger on it.  Your insights, please.
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Richard

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Posted 3 years ago

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SCDC, Champion

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That's a typical new mower blade.  We've all complained about it, but after thinking about it, maybe it is by design.  EGO doesn't need people cutting themselves while unpacking the mower.

I just have one thing to say.  Sharpen it and sharpen it often.  They don't stay very sharp.
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Blue Angel, Champion

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Agreed that most mower blades do not come in a truly sharp condition from the factory.

The sharper the blade the better the cut, and the sharper you want to keep the blade the more often you'll be sharpening it, too. Having a second blade to rotate allows sharpening the spare whenever you have time.

Commercial outfits that cut grass all day, every day, actually dull their blades slightly after sharpening on purpose. The slightly dull blade doesn't cut quite as well, but tends to maintain its performance for longer periods of time between sharpenings.

Most home owners are likely better served by keeping a truly sharp blade. A sharper blade also cuts cleaner and promotes healthier grass as it does less damage.
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Blue Angel, Champion

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Oh, and a sharper blade makes for a more efficient mower as well, using less power from the battery.
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David Cline

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I never considered possible risk of injury from shipping a sharp blade in the package.

There has been a good bit of variance in my limited sample. I bought three 20" blades for my first Ego mower, and none were exactly the same. One had some burrs, one had a small ripple pattern, one was smooth but somewhat dull.

Surprisingly, I discovered when I loaned my old mower and accessories to a neighbor that the original blade that came on the mower was actually a slightly different shape with a shorter raised ridge along the middle of the blade than the other two. I'm guessing that Ego doesn't actually produce the blades, and either bids out each production run or has multiple suppliers producing their proprietary blade design.

All that to say if you want a new blade to perform as it was intended, you should always run a file across the top and bottom of the blade before using it for the first time. Just a few diagonal passes with a medium file, always pulling toward the sharp edge as you slide along the length of the blade. To get that final razor edge you can use a fine file, whetstone, or manual or power tool sharpener.
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Richard

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Sorry, if this is a rather basic question, but are there any instructions about how to sharpen a blade?  I've not done it before.

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Jennifer VandeWater, Community Manager

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Hi Richard, instructions for how to sharpen the blade are in the manual starting on page 27. Here's a link to the manual online: https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0262/2513/files/15-0910_EGO_LM2100SP_LM2100_56V_Lithium-ion_cordle...
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Jacob

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I use my angle grinder with a 220 grit flapper wheel to sharpen mine to a fine razor point, then i use a file to finish it off. Only taking off a very small amount each time i sharpen it.
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SCDC, Champion

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Turning me on to the flapper wheel was great advice last year Jacob.
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Richard

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I took the advice given and purchased a second blade at HD.  I have a blade sharpening attachment for my power drill that has a guide to maintain the proper angle.  I'll sharpen the new blade, put it on the new mower and then sharpen the blade currently on the mower always keeping the spare sharp.  I think that will work for me, for now.
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Darlene Monds

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Can you tell me what exactly is the blade sharpening attachment you have for your drill and where do you typically find it?  Waiting for delivery of my 21" mower and extra blade do definitely want to sharpen. Thanks!

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Richard

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The sharpener is used with a drill.  I got the kit at Amazon for about $10.  It includes the attachment and balancer.  Here is the URL: http://www.amazon.com/Arnold-Blade-Balancer-Sharpener-Kit/dp/B002XU9LSC?ie=UTF8&psc=1&redire...
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SCDC, Champion

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While this will probably work, those things scare me.  If the sharpener sticks on anything while spinning, it'll jerk your hand around.  Might be a more safe alternative.  I'll stick with my bench grinder.   

I would think a hand file and a vice would be a safer alternative?
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Richard

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It worked for me.  I agree, it will bounce around if not careful.  I'm sure it will not work for everyone.
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Richard

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Ok guys, so I sharpened the new blade and installed it on the mower.  I have two questions: the 9/16 socket is fairly sloppy and moved once with I was trying to torque the bolt tight. Is this typical?  2nd... I was able to "almost" get those two holes lined up but it is not perfect -- is this a problem?  I only used one of the holes and put a spike in it, rather loosely, and tightened the bolt.
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Richard

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I was not referring to any "posts" to line up.  There was something about lining up those two holes on either sides of the bolt to line up with the holes that are underneath the blade.  I wondered how important it was to have them perfectly aligned.

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SCDC, Champion

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Pretend they are not there.  They are not relevant.  If the back of the blade is flush against the plate, that is all that matters.
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Richard

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Got it. Thanks.  I had thought it might have something to do with cooling.
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bloomz

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I bought one of those sharpeners on Amazon cuz someone said you didn't have to remove the blade.

You do, you can't get to the edge of the blade, (yes the cutting edge) without removing it.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00VTO5N2G/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1

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David Cline

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Yes, it is designed such that you pull perpendicular to the blade from the center toward the outside edge. Without removing the blade you would have to pull toward the center of the blade and it would sharpen the flat edge of the blade.

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