Chainsaw run time and power

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Over the winter with the threat of a big storm, I had visions of some big trees coming down, blocking our driveway, and completely cutting us off from everything. But a chainsaw will save us! After being so happy with the EGO blower I thought the chainsaw was a no brainer. Reviews seemed to back it up, too, which was great. So, I bought one back in January... and happily never had need of it.

Now, I'm ready to get started clearing some of the down trees in our woods, cutting it up for firewood. I've put a few batteries through the chainsaw and am left disappointed. I cut up wood measuring about 3-10 inches, mostly good oak and maple (and a little that was rotted past firewood quality). Cutting through seemed pretty slow to me, though I don't have much chainsaw experience. I was able to go to a down tree and just start cutting into firewood lengths, so there was little rest for the saw in between each piece. I was getting about 20 minutes out of a battery; after switching to my extra battery and continuing I ran into trouble with the chainsaw shutting down -- presumably the motor overheating. I've checked and refilled the bar oil, and resharpened the blade between uses.

So, I'm wondering if I have a bum chainsaw, or if I'm just asking too much of it: hard wood and more than 30 minutes of running is just too much for it?
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Dan Wolfgang

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Posted 4 years ago

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Blue Angel, Champion

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Dan, the only other thing that comes to mind is the chain tension. If the tension is too high there's excess friction which will rob battery power.

Did you check and adjust the chain per the manual?

I've never used the Ego chainsaw so I have no other advice regarding run time.
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SCDC, Champion

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Hi Dan,

Which battery are you using.  I got about an hour of run time with the 4ah battery cutting tree's with over 12" diameter, well over what I'm supposed to be using it for  :)

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Dan Wolfgang

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I've checked the chain tension and adjust it during use, as the manual indicates. That's a good suggestion because I'm sure it can make a significant difference!

I'm using the "standard" 2ah batteries (both the one that came with the chainsaw and the one for the blower I have).

Tonight I did some more cutting, this time focusing on the balsam firs on my property. Wow, what a difference! The saw chewed right through it all. This is how I expected the saw to perform! Both the apparent power of the saw and the run time were much better. The difference is, of course, that fir is a softwood and oak and maple are hardwoods. This leads me to believe that my saw is performing to spec, and it's just inadequate for much hardwood use... which is most of my property, unfortunately.
(Edited)
a gas chainsaw will empty a half liter tank and get hot after no more than 40 mins..
i think a 2 ah battery isnt enough for a chainsaw and serious use.
im aiming for the 18inch chainsaw with 7.5 ah+backpack link. i havent seen this in use yet, i hope the cable going out of the side of the chainsaw isnt too awkward.
(i realise im replying to a 2yo comment)
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Blue Angel, Champion

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Just wondering, how hard are you pushing on the saw while cutting? The only reason I ask is, if the saw took a half hour of continuous use before it started shutting down, maybe if you push on it just a little less it would just keep going?

I remember watching a review video of the chainsaw and the reviewer commented on the protection circuits shutting the saw down, and that he was able to avoid that by just working the saw a little less hard and letting it cut at its own pace.

Ok, I looked up that review, it was John from Workshop Addict:

http://youtu.be/OFv-MOD3Y-E

He demonstrates the overload protection on a 12" Ash log. Are you seeing the same behaviour with your saw when it overloads? If so, his suggestions may be the answer.
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Dan Wolfgang

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I have experimented a little with pushing and have seen the overload protection kick in. It's easy to see that the saw cuts much, much better without pressure, just letting the saw do the work. So no, I'm not causing the overload protection to kick in.

In the video, at 2:32 when John is cutting up the wood into firewood-sized chunks, that is the activity I have been doing. With many down trees on the woods of my property I can just start cutting and keep cutting. And, as I said, in about 20 minutes of cutting hardwood the 2ah battery is spent, and dropping another in sees the thermal protection kick in after about 10 more minutes of sawing.

I appreciate your thoughts, but I'm coming to the conclusion that the EGO saw is just too light-duty for my property.
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Blue Angel, Champion

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Here's another of his more recent videos centered on the 15" trimmer. The only reason I bring it up here is because he mentions Ego's new 7.5Ah battery, and actually shows it in the chainsaw.

For anyone with a ton of cutting to do who is concerned about battery life, the 7.5 will extend that significantly:

http://youtu.be/fPYVORr8BuY
I just cut up an entire TRUCKLOAD (overflowing in my pickup's bed) and my 2 .0Ah battery is showing full charge when I put it on the charger.  Either the charger is lying, or I barely used any watt-hours at all - I don't know what to believe at this point.  
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SCDC, Champion

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Actually you should have used up that battery.  If it was soft wood, who knows.  I can do a whole day of work off of 2 4ah batteries.
It was Maple trees, but I did make it sound more extreme than it probably is.  Although I did fill up my truck bed, I only made maybe 15 - 20 cuts, most of what filled the bed were smaller twigs and their foliage.  Those 15 - 20 cuts ranged from 2" to about 8" in diameter.  

Yes, my truck bed is overflowing, but I didn't cut everything down all pretty.  I left branches going every which way, so there's probably a lot of airspace in the truck-bed, but otherwise it'd been too heavy anyway.  

I didn't mean to exaggerate, but it really is overflowing.  Smaller maple limbs though.  Only cut short enough to fit into the 6.5' bed, not like I chopped everything up for firewood.  So like a bunch of long pieces, just to take felled limbs to the dump tomorrow.  My bad.  
(Edited)
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SCDC, Champion

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Ahh.  I was cutting 12" to 16" trees and it gave me a heck of a workout.  The chainsaw did great.  I didn't fare so well.  (sore back).  With smaller trees, I believe you would have no problem with the 2ah battery.  The chainsaw is pretty good with batteries.  Not to mention a fresh chain.
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csimone1986 .

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Hi, i've the same problem with mine CS1600E chainsaw. I'm actually using new 5Ah batteries and 6Ah batteries.
when i cut 15"diameter trees after just 3  cuts (slicing tree) the chainsaw stops like protection activates. If i swap batteries it happens the same.
Motor and battery are normal temperature. I think could be internal overheat issue. Maybe motor controller.

If i wait about 5 minutes and restart cutting the chainsaw come back working, but after few minutes cutting it stops again, and more often every time i relase and engage power switch.

I written to assitance because i'm from italy and for me isn't possible to call in usa.
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csimone1986 .

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ps i cut oak tree and beech tree
i think you should make a post about it. i hope you get satisfying answers. 
if their chainsaws cant make more than 3 cuts without overheating, its not good.