chainsaw chain comes off every five minutes

  • 7
  • Problem
  • Updated 1 month ago
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It's brand new, I was able to use it the first time for about 2 hours before the chain popped off. Now a week later, the chain only stays on for a short period of time. Can I use this chainsaw in the wet, on wet wood? It has oil, and I have the chain tensioned. But maybe too tight?
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John McDonald

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Posted 3 years ago

  • 7
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John McDonald

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I haven't replied since my first post on this thread. Dry weather did the trick and I was able to finish the job flawlessly. I also noticed that it doesn't like small branches in the way when you are trying to cut a main branch. And like the above poster, technique is important too. I'll keep it around- I was the only one on my street that didn't call a tree service to clear fallen trees last winter; I had me a chain saw and a u-haul :) As soon as it dried out, that is...
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LoneWolf04

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Curious as well. I don't remember a keeper on the sprocket. I may have to pull the manual and look into it closer.
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Michael G

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I may have to call CS myself. I've used the saw for maybe ten cuts and I was cutting down the stump for an 8" diameter blue spruce yesterday and the chain came off. I've been using chainsaws sparingly for 20 years and never had this happen. Took me 10-15 minutes to get the chain untangled. When I got it back on I noticed the tension setting was maxed out and the chain was at the correct tension. Hope this thing doesn't eat chains this quickly.

Mike
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(a)Typical Engineer

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It's possible that when a chainsaw throws a chain, depending on how it gets tangled, there is a chance you could have stretched only one section of the chain.  The way to check this is to mark the chain (with a marker), and then move the chain, and check tension, and do that all the way around.  If the chain is either very tight or loose in one spot, that is the stretched area.  If you get all the way around and the tension is even, then you chain has stretched uniformly.
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Michael G

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Even more reason for me to call CS. If this chainsaw is prone to throwing chains and it needs replacement once this happens this could get expensive.
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(a)Typical Engineer

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The main reason a chainsaw will throw a chain is because the operator did one of two things: 1) did not adjust the chain tension properly (mostly too loose), or 2) used improper technique, especially on the thinner 0.043" bar/chain, which is more susceptible to bar deflection.

Just like any power too, improper technique and poor maintenance will lead to premature failure.  The micro-lite (0.043") bar/chain has been fairly reliable when used correctly in my experience.