Can I charge these battery packs from an inverter (to utilize solar power)?

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I like the idea of being eco-friendly and would like to utilize a solar-system to "farm" power for my new EGO machines.  Before I plug my super-charger (the fast one) into my inverter, I want to be sure no damage will occur.  

These chargers say 550 watts on them.  As long as my inverter supplies enough current for them, would everything be kosher to power them this way?  Would I need a "PURE SINE WAVE" inverter should I do this, or would MODIFIED sine waves work just as well?  

Is there any reason why this may not be a good idea?  Thanks.
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E Power GO Beyond Belief

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Posted 4 years ago

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Dominic49

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many volts and watts is your solar array?
Well, the juice would be coming from a battery bank, which is 450Ah . . .  at 12V, which would be converted to 120V to provide 550W for one of these fast chargers . . .  Which would effectively need 46A of current from the 12V battery bank...  not accounting for inefficiencies and losses.  My inverter cam draw 125A continuous from the 12V battery bank, and can provide 1500W (or 12.5A at 120V AC), so I'm thinking I could run two of these EGO superchargers at the same time. at least.  

Let's say I only wanted to deplete my 12V battery bank by 20%, I should be able to charge an EGO 5Ah battery about four times, if it only takes 1/2 hour per charge . . .  The solar panels would just be to replenish the batteries throughout the days.  So, watts and volts aren't an issue.  Plenty of those to go around.  

Just need to know if an inverter might damage either the EGO Li-Ion packs, or these super-chargers from modified or pure sine waves.  I've been googling around, with mixed opinions.  Some say it will damage their tool batteries, others say it works just fine - I'd love to know the science behind it all.  

Some say it depends on if the chargers use certain kinds of electronics and what-not.  

Some say PURE SINE wave inverters would be okay, but I wanted to ask the experts here before I incur any irreversible detrimental consequences to my new expensive investments.  Thanks.  

- MOTO

EGO 15" BRUSHLESS Trimmer
EGO Blower
EGO Mower
EGO Chainsaw
2.0, 2.5, 4.0, and 5.0Ah packs
(Edited)
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giggleherz .

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I am glad you mentioned this because I was just about to plug my EGO charger to my thousand watt inverter. I have yet to use the inverter except to test it on a fan I never thought it might hurt the charger. TY you may have just saved me some trouble.
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Blue Angel, Champion

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Moto, I'm far from an expert in this area, but I would imagine an inverter designed to power electronic type household equipment would output a sine wave of a certain minimum "cleanliness" standard, and also that the Ego charger would have some sort of electronic protection circuitry built-in to protect it from dirty signals, voltage spikes, etc.

If your power supply setup has sufficient output I can't see why it wouldn't work, especially if it works fine with other electronics?

Having said all that, I have no idea what would happen if the output of your solar array was to drop during a cloudy period during charging... is this even possible?  I have no idea, your inverter may have documentation that would indicate its behavior in this type of scenario.  Maybe it shuts off completely in this scenario?

If you come up with some concrete information I'd love to know more about it.  I have yet to delve into the world of solar power, but I've been intensely intrigued by it for some time now.  Especially with the threat of our provincial Gov't privatizing our power utilities, for "The benefit" of the taxpayer.  Right.
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Blue Angel, Champion

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Ha, was typing while you were posting.  I guess if you're using a battery bank you've got no worries about losing power during a charge, unless your battery bank depletes.
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Dominic49

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I'd me more untested in coming up with a dc to dc charging solution. Adding an inverter is just adding another layer of inefficiency. Has anyone done a tear down of the ego charger yet I'm curious how the circuit looks. Although I'm sure it is probably rather simple sing the BMS on the battery should take care of all the charging contol.
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Blue Angel, Champion

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I'm not so sure it would be a simple task.  There are temperature and data connections between the charger and battery brains.  Attempting to charge manually could render the battery useless if the charge controller was convinced some funny business was going on.

I agree that converting DC to AC, then back to DC is inefficient, unless one has the electrical ability to reverse engineer Ego's charging system I would think the safe route would be to just leave well enough alone. :-)
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Jacob

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Dc to dc would not work because you must increase the voltage. This is done with a transformer. Then the voltage is ran through another transformer inside of the charger that reduces the voltage from 120 ac to whatever the charge output to the battery is multiplied by 1.414. This number is RMS or divided by 0.707. This gives the charger the Volts in DC it needs to do the work. You would have to bypass all of that circuitry and connect 4 batteries in series at 14.4v or 5 batteries at 12v and reduce to what the battery needs. This is not a good idea. EGO would need to make a 12vdc charger which they should do as lawn services could charge on the go without an additional inverter.
I may be wrong also on being able to increase dc volts without an inverter.
(Edited)
Any word from the EGO people about my question?  I'd really like to know the official stance on this, so I don't hurt anything, or void any warranty.  If a modified sine wave inverter would wreck the chargers or battery packs, would a pure sine wave inverter be okay?  
So . . . no official response, huh?  It remains a mystery . . . forever.  Sigh.  
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Jacob

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Of course you can. Its still the correct voltage. 110/120 VAC. Its like asking if you can charge them with a generator. Pure sine wave inverter is best, but i would think a modified wave inverter would also work.
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Jennifer VandeWater, Community Manager

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Official Response
Thanks for your question. We recommend that you use a pure sine wave inverter. Please come back and let us know how it’s working for you!  We're sorry for the delay in our response.  We were double checking some facts internally to be sure we gave you the best response possible.
(Edited)
Thank you for your official acknowledgement and answer, Jennifer VandeWater!  Pure Sine Wave it will be!  Regards.
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Dean Kleinitz

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Well did it work ?
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Kevin Dutkiewicz

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My shed has about 181W of solar panels on the back that feed into 700AH of 12V GSLA batteries. I then use a 1500W invertor to charge my EGO batteries. not the most efficient but I have gobs of power and will just about never run out. my next goal is to use one of the batteries in a portable power station with 110V AC and a decent amount of 12V DC power. 
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Michael Stephensen

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So...I'm sorry, this is so interesting but I don't have the experience, can you break it down a bit?.... I need about 180 W of solar panel and this goes into a bank of 12 volt (car batteries??) that total 700 AH.  This then goes (in series or parallel?) to a pure sine inverter to my ego chargers.  I have 3 Ego chargers.  Will that be a big enough system?  I'm sorry for my amateurish questions but I don't know much about this but it is a FANTASTIC idea.  Thanks. 
(Edited)
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giggleherz .

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You don't mention if you have a voltage regulator between your batteries and your solar panels? If not that's the best place to start, you don't mention how many batteries you have but without the voltage regulator they can overcharge and explode. The inverter to give you 110V for the EGO chargers needs to be in parallel with the batteries. Be careful you can ruin something really fast just by crossing one wire.
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Michael Stephensen

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Hmm.  My wife frowns on explosions.  Maybe I'll just wait until someone somewhere maps it out clearly for neophytes.  I don't, at this time have anything set up.  Does the Pure Sine Wave Inverter act as a regulator?  (I have four batteries and chargers by the way.) Thanks.
(Edited)
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giggleherz .

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I have four one hundred watt solar panels the feeds into a (Coleman Charge Controller). The charge controller keeps the right voltage going into the batteries and stops them from over charging. Run your inverter from the battery bank and then plug in the EGO charger.
 Good luck with the project I myself am just about ready to start charging my EGO tools with sunlight I find the idea very exciting.
(Edited)
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Adam Neusbaum

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I've found success with charging my batteries on the go with this inverter.
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St Louis Rickshaw

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Which inverter? Nothing is showing up in your posting.
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Judd Larson

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This reply was created from a merged topic originally titled Is there any solar charge controller for EGO 56 v battery.

Looking for a way to use solar panel to trickle charge the EGO battery.
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Robby

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I have this working. My approach is to use a sealed lead acid battery as a buffer, then rig a 12V=>120V inverter into the Ego charger, connected to a timer. Run the timer about 1 hour/day, or however long it takes to make 80% use of a day's sunlight. Make sure the inverter has low-voltage protection to avoid deep discharging the SLA.