Blade or motor problems

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  • Updated 3 years ago
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Hhello i bought an ego lawn mower.. but since i have used it.. it just dryes and kills my grass.. i thought it was the blade.. but then replaced it with another original blade but the problem persists.. keeps drying out the grass and not giving a clean cut.. is the power in my motor ok?
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Enri Villarreal

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Posted 3 years ago

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SCDC, Champion

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Official Response

Hello Enri,

The first step with this mower is to sharpen the blade to a razor like consistency.  Please note that the blade dulls very quickly, especially with wet or thick grass.  It takes me all of a few minutes to remove, sharpen and put the blade back on my mower.  So, I sharpen it every cut.  Even the new blades are dull by my standards.

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Blue Angel, Champion

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Agreed 100%. A sharp blade makes all the difference when looking at cut quality. A dull blade tears the grass and leaves a ragged edge that dries out quickly and stresses the grass blade. A sharp mower blade cuts cleanly and the grass suffers much less.

With my small lawn, clay based soil and trying to cut while the grass is dry (not a problem with the drought conditions we have this year!), my blade has stayed sharp since the spring. I usually need to sharpen it every couple of months or so.
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Steve Valdes

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This may be a case of cutting off too much of the blade and/or cutting too low. Generally if your grass is 3" high the max you should cut it down to would be 2". The rule of thumb is to cut no more than 1/3rd of the blade of grass. Also depending on your grass type you may find the lower portion of the blade is not as green as the top of the grass so when cut low it looks more beige than green...if this is the case it needs to be cut higher as this will not change and has nothing to do with the mower. It would be interesting to know more about your specific situation.
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Blue Angel, Champion

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Great point, Steve! My lawn has a thick layer of beige-ish color closer to the ground as you say, and since I'm mowing much taller this year that layer is out of sight even after a mow.
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SCDC, Champion

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Great Steve.  With the heat and drought we are dealing with, I'm having to cut a notch higher than usual.  Also, the brown dead grass clippings seem to be more pronounced.  One thing I've noticed since switching to an electric mower is that I have a bit of a thatch buildup problem now.  I'm going to have to bag for a while.
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Blue Angel, Champion

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I've decided to bag for this entire season. Two reasons are that I had to do quite a bit of heavy raking this spring after the snow melted, and also I'm trying to get rid of problem weeds and grasses that are causing me grief and I have myself convinced if I bag I can eliminate these plants from seeding.

Time will tell if it's the right approach. I don't like the idea of removing the clippings and their nutrients from he lawn, but I'm fighting other battles at the moment and fertilizer should keep things green in the meantime.
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Brad Christie

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@blue if you aren't, avoid the "weed and feed" and focus primarily on feeding. That aside, use a concentrated weed killer and a sprayer to mix and "spot" spray problem areas. Two schools of thought:

1. Weed killing entire lawn puts unnecessary stress on healthy areas. It also is at a lower dosage and generally less effective.
2. Spot shotting works better on the areas you've targeted given slightly higher concentrate (but now focused on specific areas).

Any competent lawn company applies the same principals. At this point, I don't even remove any weeds and let them choke out after spraying. Been working out very well this year (and saving my back two fold).
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Blue Angel, Champion

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In Canada (Ontario anyway), spot spray is the only option and of questionable effectiveness since the cosmetic pesticide/herbicide ban was put in place.

My new part-time occupation is picking/pulling weeds and crab grass. The only saving grace is the small size of my yard. :-)

I am fertilizing this year, which is doing wonders for the grass and allowing me to cut much taller.
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Brad Christie

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You'll be forever pulling, good luck. I used to do that, but even when you think you have the entire offender, the roots return with more vigor.

A ban is tough though. Is it seasonal? I know Florida has bans for certain times if the year, but also generally applies to wide spreadingredients (for fear of wash out, etc.). I would think small doses are acceptable, but IANAL.
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Blue Angel, Champion

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Permanent ban on many of the most effective chemicals as far as I know. Industry can use them (farms, turf growers etc) but they're no longer to be used on residential lawns.

I'm hoping since crabgrass is an annual, if I pick it before it seeds it may not come back. I'll let you know next summer. :-)
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SCDC, Champion

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I've had fantastic luck keeping weeds in check by cutting my grass low and often.  But since I'm dealing with abnormal thatch build up, I'm having to mow higher and bag until things clear up.  First time I've had a thatch and clippings problem in 25 years.
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Brad Christie

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With the little water and high temperatures we've seen this year, short grass isn't in my future. If I don't leave it at 3", I'll end up mowing a beach the following week.
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SCDC, Champion

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Brad, I think we have an atmospheric wedge in upstate SC.  NO measurable rain in about a month and not a day below 90.  I'm already mowing a beach.
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Blue Angel, Champion

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Ah, the atmospheric wedge... not to be confused with the atomic wedgie!
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Brad Christie

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I hear yang. Southern NH here, and just started getting rain past few days and cooler weather following. Otherwise, been 90s for month straight with no rain (which is abnormal for us). Lucky we have irrigation, saving grace. Though I only do about an inch a week. The real saver has been keeping it tall and broke down and added a wetting agent just in case.



so far so good.
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Looking good, Brad!

After little rain to speak of and none in sight, I think I'm going to break out the sprinkler tonight. The front yard is starting to look a little stressed out, though the back still looks pretty good.

Mowing taller has really impressed me. Fertilizing and mowing taller since last fall, even with the drought conditions Ontario has seen, this will be the first time in probably six-seven weeks I've had to water. Any money I've spent on fertilizer has probably been more than made up for with water savings.
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Dave .

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You may be cutting the grass too short.
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I bought my new 21" Self Propelled a month ago and thought the blade was sharp, until my first cut.  Did notice the left side of the lawnmower not cutting the grass well, so I decided to take the blade off to sharpen it - watch a YouTube video on how to do this.  It was quite easy and now the mower is doing a better job.  Hopefully I don't have to do this more than twice a season - per EGO recommendation.
(Edited)
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SCDC, Champion

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You should do it after every few cuts, to be honest.  It's soft metal and dulls quickly with thick or damp grass.
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David HD, Champion

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Given how easy it is to remove the blade and sharpen it, I will definitely consider doing this more often - thanks for the advice!
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SCDC, Champion

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You, your lawn and your mower will all be happier.