Battery storage temp

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I have purchased 11 5.0 a h batteries to use for residential lawn service. I'm in Florida and want to store the fresh batteries in my car with the windows down. I noticed they can store at 80° but they can charge at a hundred and four degrees. Has anyone tried this out storing fresh batteries in a vehicle with the windows down. If not how do you cool them if you do store them in your car. I thought about using a cooler with plastic ice containers. But I'm afraid of condensation
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Sean S

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Posted 2 months ago

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Prairiedog

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At the opposite end of the thermometer here in Minnesota, we have a little 12v lead battery generator for worksites that we store in a styrofoam cooler to help shield from extreme temps. But man, I sure wouldn't want to risk that investment by storing them unprotected somehow in car. Even with the windows down, temps will well exceed 110 especially if you can't keep the vehicle in the shade all day.
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Blue Angel, Champion

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If you store them in a cooler with the lid closed and they are cool when you put them in there, they could surely sit in the car for an awful long time before they would warm up to dangerous temperatures. Put them in the cooler, fully charged, straight from your air-conditioned house and I’m sure they will be fine.
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Sean S

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Thanks Blue! I was thinking the same thing. I won't have to charge a battery until my third job( I ALSO GOT THE NEW DOUBLE BATTERY MOWER) I plan giving a $ convenience credit for letting me plug in. But I have so many batteries that I can let the first set charge 2 jobs later after it cools a little. I also bought two cooling mats made with the same gel inside the batteries. Thought I would use those to cool freshly charged batteries before they went into the cooler. What do you think??
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Blue Angel, Champion

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When the batteries come off the charger they should be very close to ambient temperature, so putting them directly into the cooler should be ok. You could put a freezer pack in with the batteries if you wanted, as long as condensation wasn’t pooling and touching the batteries.

I’m not sure a cooling mat would work, it will be the same temperature as ambient, no? Also, the mat would only touch the outside of the batteries, but the cells are inside.
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Sean S

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Yes you have a good point. Maybe I'll just use the cooling mats to cover the top of the batteries in the cooler. Or maybe I'll just put one underneath and one on top if they're on my car seat. I'm going to figure this out and mainly with your help. Thank you so much. You've been invaluable so far for me
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Blue Angel, Champion

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No sweat, Sean! Good luck!
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Prairiedog

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I agree, the mass of 11 cool batteries going in will keep themselves cool in a well-sized, better grade camping cooler, like a Yeti.
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Lehigh Lawn Pros

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Hi Sean,

I also do residential lawn service in Florida (close to Ft. Myers).
I use the PowerHead with edger and line trimmer, and the backpack blower.
I put nine 5.0AH batteries into service starting in April.
I generally discharge them fully in the field, and then recharge them overnight (in an air conditioned room). Probably about 60 discharge/recharge cycles so far (per battery).

Out in the field, when not in use, I keep the batteries and the PowerHead in a heavy-duty and fairly weatherproof plastic storage box on my open trailer. When It's not raining I leave the lid slightly open  so they can ventilate. It does get pretty hot in there, but so far I haven't had any battery issues,
except for one that seemingly over-discharged and and won't recharge. But I don't think that that was a heat-related issue.

So, they seem to be quite robust regarding heat tolerance. I think that keeping them out of direct sun and rain when not in use, and providing at least minimal ventilation may be all that is required.

Time will tell, and I'll plan to keep you all updated on the long term reliability.

By the way, I saw my first EGO mower in operation in my area the other day,
a gentleman that lives next to one of my customers had just purchased it,
a self-propelled with a bagger. It seemed do be doing a very good job on the St Augustine
lawn in dry afternoon conditions.

PS   Sean, if you need a line trimmer/edger I highly recommend the EGO PH1400 PowerHead,
I absolutely love mine. May God bless you, your business, and your EGO equipment!

Bob
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Sean S

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Hey! Bob That is awesome information. I figured it would be okay but you know how it goes weird things pop up when you least expect it. Sounds like it's tested and true with you out in the field. I'm glad to see that the Ego lawn mower was able to plow through that Bermuda that stuff is a mess. It's pretty much all centipede up here so I should be golden. Thanks for the recommend on the power head. I hope your business continues to do well. Thank you for the blessings talk to you soon