7.5Ah battery questions

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  • Updated 2 years ago
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  • (Edited)
what is the life expectancy of the 7.5ah battery?  How should I store the batteries for the winter when I will not be using them?
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AA

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Posted 3 years ago

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szwoopp, Champion

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Life will vary depending on usage. 5-7 years may get general agreement as an expected life. Hopefully more - possibly less.

Store the battery in a cool dry place.  Generally indoors where it will not be subject to any extreme temperatures.
(Edited)
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AA

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Thanks,  do you need to drain the batteries before storing them?  
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szwoopp, Champion

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No they have a built in system that brings the battery down to 30% charge after 30 days of being idle.
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AA

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Great,  Thanks!
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szwoopp, Champion

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AA What tools are you considering ?
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AA

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The backpack blower and the 21" self propelled mower
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szwoopp, Champion

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I have the 21" sp mower and it has been great.  Mulching has been working fine  although results seem to vary based on lawn type and user expectations.  I enjoy that when the SP is not engages the mower is very easy to push, so much so that I find myself not using the SP quite a bit.  Plenty of power with the 7.5 battery. 
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AA

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Thanks szwoopp.  I just spent 2 hours mowing with my gas mower.  It takes me about and hour and 15 to do the back and between 35-45 mins for the front.  With all the rain the grass has been grown thick and fast and it starts to bog down the gas mower.  Based on everyones comments, it looks like with 2 batteries I would be able to get it all done with the 21" sp mower.  Great comments, suggestions and discussion.  Hopefully soon I will have several gas machines for sale.  :)
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(a)Typical Engineer

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In addition to the above, have you read the manual; there is specific storage information in there.

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AA

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Thanks, I have not purchased any of the products yet.  I am doing research beforehand.
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(a)Typical Engineer

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Ego's pretty good with having the manuals available, the one for the 7.5 is here (manual tab):

https://egopowerplus.com/collections/power-batteries-chargers/products/56v-lithium-ion-7-5-amp-hour-...

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AA

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Thanks!
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Tom Austin

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Where are the specs for storage conditions? I am in Cape Cod, MA and plan to store the battery and the mower in an unheated shed. Is that OK?
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Blue Angel, Champion

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Tom, you should keep the batteries above freezing and below 80F during storage. Keeping them in the house is a good idea if they won't be used for a while.
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Tom Austin

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What's the impact of them being stored below freezing?
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Blue Angel, Champion

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The manual doesn't really caution against storage below freezing (only above 80F), but does state that the batteries may not perform properly if you try to use them after sitting below freezing.
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Amber F., Official EGO Rep

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Official Response
Regarding life expectancy: Battery life is usually measured in terms of recharge cycles, so it’s tough for us to predict the exact number of cycles your battery will produce due to all sorts of usage and environmental conditions. It is because of this, as well as for our customers’ peace of mind, that we offer the three year warranty. Also, here is a corresponding thread that might be helpful: https://community.egopowerplus.com/ego/topics/what-is-the-life-expectancy-of-the-7-5ah-battery
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szwoopp, Champion

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Well that was an interesting read.  Morons and trolls with too much time on our hands.  A fair assessment :)

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Egocentric

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Lions, morons, and trolls oh my.  How will we ever make it to Emerald City with these lack of definitive answers?  

This is in reference to the conversation that was in the referenced link in Amber's post above, not this thread.   A little tense?  
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Oregon Mike, Champion

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Charge/discharge cycles aside, since the warranty is 3 years, life expectancy is...3 years. Now, if you buy the extended warranty..... Just kidding about all of the above. Got a few uses before winter set in and then I didn't even use any of my Ego stuff for nearly 6 months over the winter/early spring. I expect the batteries to last a good long time. Note that everything was kept in our garage which is unheated and uninsulated. So, not *as* cold as directly outdoors, but cold enough. 5ah battery was in the mower and 2.5ah was in the string trimmer. They both got a charge before first use this spring. Both performed perfectly. 
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szwoopp, Champion

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Not sure what cold enough is, but hopefully it stays above freezing (that would be too cold).
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Oregon Mike, Champion

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Yeah, it was above freezing in the garage for sure. Although, we may have been able to hang meat out there. LOL
(Edited)
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szwoopp, Champion

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Then cold enough is not too cold and you are all good. 
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David HD, Champion

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In reviewing the Battery Manual, it did not "specify" how low of a temperature you can store your battery, but would not recommend it in a "freezing" condition.  The biggest stress you can put on Lithium-Ion batteries are heat and high charge voltage  (per Battery University).  Under normal operating conditions should be good.



On the flip side, under Cold Weather Operation, you might experience "pulse" for the first use - per the Battery Manual (see below).  These EGO batteries are well built and should provide for a long life cycle, as long as one does not abuse it.

(Edited)
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Oregon Mike, Champion

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Yeah, Szwoopp. I wasn't worried about the temperature, just trying to indicate to OP that garage temps should be fine for their batteries. 
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szwoopp, Champion

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I guess that depends on where you live.

The manual gives these guides which unfortunately are incomplete and a bit contradicting.  Charge at 104 but store at 80 ?


So I guess safe is 32 - 80 (or 86 based on Davids post)
(Edited)
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David HD, Champion

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Most people probably charge their batteries in their garages in between jobs.  And since most garages are not insulated to provide a similar "temperature controlled" environment like inside a home, the likelihood that the temperature could reach above 80 F is probable - especially in the summer months.  Which is why the manual provides a temperature range of 32F - 104F for charging your batteries, to include this "real life" scenario.

On the flip side, if you are storing your batteries until the next project, then you should try to keep them in an environment "free of moisture" and below 80 F.  I normally store my batteries inside the house for this reason.  With the prices of these "stand alone" batteries, I can not afford to buy a replacement one - so better safe than sorry ... :-)
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szwoopp, Champion

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Makes sense charging and operation v storage.  Most people will certainly use the batteries in the summer when it is 90 outside, but best to store at a more moderate temperature.   (I think I killed the horse)
(Edited)
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David HD, Champion

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Maybe not, as these horses are tough ... :-)
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Egocentric

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Interesting discussion here.  Being a battery newbie, I am taking it all in.  
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Egocentric

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Weird, I got a double post, and I can't remove the duplicate.  
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Amber F., Official EGO Rep

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We gotcha, Egocentric :-) 
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Egocentric

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Thanks for the fix. 
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Abe

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Looking in the manual, I don't see an answer to this battery question: When I charge the battery, and the lights indicate that it reaches full charge, should I take it out of the charger or leave it in the charger until I mow again. I'm asking where the battery should be, after charge, during the weeklong wait between times that I mow? In the battery charger? Or in the mower? Or neither? Thanks.
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Oregon Mike, Champion

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No problem to leave it on the charger. From page 14 in the standard charger's manual - " The battery pack will fully charge if left on the charger, but it will not overcharge. If the battery pack remains on the charger for one month or more, it will perform self-maintenance and drop to 30% charge capacity. If this occurs, reinstall the battery pack on the charger to recharge it fully". Note that the same thing is found in the rapid charger's manual too.

I tend to leave mine in the mower until I'm ready to charge it. Then, I'll charge it and either leave it on the charger or remove it from the charger if I happen to think about it. Otherwise, it won't hurt the battery to leave it on the charger.
(Edited)