Do I have to drain battery before recharging it?

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The Home Depot person told me to use the battery til it discharges completely before re charging it. Is this corrrect? Or can I charge it between mows (once a week or so?
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Walter Neumann

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Posted 3 years ago

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Scott

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Page 12 of the battery user guide indicates you do not need to run it down before charging:

"It is not necessary to run down the battery pack charge before recharging. The Lithium-Ion battery can be charged at any time and will not develop a "memory" when charged after only a partial discharge."
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Oregon Mike, Champion

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From the 4ah and 2ah battery pack manual - 

"It is not necessary to run down the battery pack charge before recharging. The Lithium Ion battery can be charged at any time and will not develop a “memory” when charged after only a partial discharge. Use the power indicator to determine when the battery pack needs to be recharged."

Probably the same for all the other Ego batteries too.
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Walter Neumann

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Thanks, I shall re read the battery and mower manuals!!
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bloomz

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Don't do it!!! You know real men never read instruction.
We'll have to revoke ur man card.
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Amber F., Official EGO Rep

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Official Response
Hi Walter! The community is correct: you do not need to drain your battery prior to charging. Also, here’s a similar thread on batteries that you might find helpful: https://community.egopowerplus.com/ego/topics/battery-questions
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Rick

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Yeah that whole discharge mindset comes from historical rechargeable batteries. They would perform best if fully discharged and recharged. Lithium batteries don't suffer from that issue, otherwise you would have to fully discharge your cell phone before plugging it into the charger at night. Your HD employee needs a little update into modern battery technologies.
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Michael S.

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So from the standpoint of preserving and extending the battery life, it makes no difference whether
you mow weekly until it runs out and then recharge or charge every time between mowings?

Is it best to keep it at least somewhat charged (don't let it run out completely)?   I thought it said should not run below 30% or so charge level.
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Blue Angel, Champion

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Lithium ion batteries are happy when they're stored at a partial charge. If you are getting multiple cuts out of a single battery charge, I don't see anything wrong with that.

The only thing I wouldn't do is deplete the battery completely to the point where the light is flashing red and then let the battery sit for weeks or months before charging it.

Depleting the battery below 30% won't hurt it. Ego chose 30% as a good storage point for battery longevity, that's all.
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Rick

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In actuality lithium batteries do not like to be fully charged or depleted. The Chevy Volt for instance does not charge over 90% and does not deplete under 10%!
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Blue Angel, Champion

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Correct. These protections are all built into the battery's management system.

The volt works that way for a slightly different reason as well. As the battery loses capacity over the years the battery management system will utilize a greater and greater percentage of the battery's capacity to keep the driving range the same.

That's my understanding based on the reading I did on the first gen Volt, anyway.
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Egocentric

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In a little Ego-maniac moment, I briefly, very briefly, gave the Chevy Bolt, the all electric mini SUV, a glance.  238 mile range.  200 HP.  9 hours to fully charge using the 240 V home charger (don't quote me on that).  Starts at I think $36K US.  There are tax incentives, but very pricey for all the more car you are getting compared to similar priced gas vehicles, but a steal compared to existing Teslas...no comment on the ones soon to hit the market.  Tempting but I chickened out.  
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Blue Angel, Champion

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Most people need an investment like that to pay off in order to justify it. EVs often have such long break even periods that the risk just doesn't add up.

If I had more money I would have bought a Volt for sure, but I don't so I didn't. :-(
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Egocentric

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Like you say if I had money, I would consider a Bolt as a second car, but then again if I had money I would probably consider a Tesla for a first car.  
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Rick

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I have 2 volts. Got them both for a good price ;). One was a dealer demo with like 2k miles and one was a couple years used with 30k miles.
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Blue Angel, Champion

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Nice!
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Michael S.

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I have not tested but cutting my grass takes about 15 minutes so probably could get up to 4 mowings per charge (battery and mower are new).  It's more convenient to charge sparingly, so plan to charge every 3 mowings that way can be sure the battery won't run out while mowing.  Seems OK from discussion above.
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Blue Angel, Champion

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Yep, you're good to go!