Average lifespan of 4.0 Ah battery

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I bought a 20" mower model LM2000 back in June 2014. The 4.0 Ah battery finally failed (blinking orange indicator). Overall, I don't have any complaints about the mower. Like laptops, I figure I would get about 4-5 years off the battery. Is 4 years about the expected life for these batteries?
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Tony

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Posted 2 weeks ago

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Paul Christenson

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Battery life can vary by how often and hard you stress the cells...example...if you continually run it until it is "empty"...that battery's life should be shorter than one that is always recharged after a draw down of only a half

If you store the battery in high temperature environment...that will "age" a battery, as well.
(Edited)
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Michael G

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Is this info correct???? I've had Makita Li-Ion batteries in my power tools for years and always let them drain before charging. Just this year I had one battery fail after about 10-12 years of use.

Mike
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Blue Angel, Champion

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It shouldn’t matter whether you have all of your charge cycles at 100% depth of discharge or all of them at 50% depth of discharge twice as often. As long as the cells are kept within their safe operating range their total power output during their lifetime should be about the same. This is where Ego’s integrated battery management system shines.
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bloomz

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1 day after warranty expires...such is life.
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Blue Angel, Champion

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Tony, I would guess that your battery had a premature electronics failure and not a cell related problem, but it’s impossible to know without taking the cells out and testing them.

Rough estimates based on cell manufacturer data indicate most people should get somewhere between 5 to 10 years of service out of one of these batteries, the latter likely being more common.
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Tony

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Thanks for the replies. I don't think I have stressed the mower or the batteries. Mowing season is June to September here in Pennsylvania, about once a week. In cold weather I bring the battery in the house fully charged. I mow in the #4 height setting and it takes me about 20 minutes each time. I usually charge it after every mow. The battery never gave me a low-charge indication. I will get a 5 Ah battery this time. I'll take apart the 4 Ah battery. Who knows, maybe I will find a loose connection that I can fix myself. The trimmer that came with the mower has a 2 Ah battery that is still good.
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Tony

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Update: The plot thickens. After a couple of days I checked the battery and it was still flashing orange. I cut a notch on a flat screwdriver (the small ones that you get at trade shows) with a Dremmel tool, and used it to remove the screws. I disassembled the battery looking for anything loose. I proceeded to remove the board assembly that has the battery contacts and when I pushed the button, the LED went green!
I moved the wires and tapped everywhere to see if I could make it flash orange. The LED continued green. I slowly reassembled the battery (this time using Philips screws). I ran the battery in the mower for about 20 seconds in the garage without problems (raining at the time). I put the battery in the charged and it shows full charge. I'll post another update once I try it in the lawn.
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Blue Angel, Champion

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Nice! Hopefully it was just a loose connection.
I am having a similar problem - We bought the mower/battery used (but only a year or two old) and it worked like a charm for two months. We returned from a vacation to a bushy lawn, and halfway through the front, I got a solid orange on the mower with blinking orange on the battery. The weather was not hot at the time, but the shed where the mower is stored was. The battery is kept in a cool basement. Putting it on the charger showed it was only 25% discharged, and it didn’t feel warm. I cleaned the mower, and waited for suitable mowing weather. After 3 days, I checked the battery and it still blinks orange when I push the button. Trying it in the mower gives a brief whir before the orange lights come back showing overheating. I suppose I can try opening my battery as you have, but I’d prefer not to.
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Tony

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I still don't know how I "fixed" other than taking it apart and putting it back together. It suggests of a loose connection somewhere although I couldn't find one. You may try tapping the battery with a rubber mallet or something heavy but rubbery so as not to shock the battery too hard. Try around the top where the button is and near the contacts. By the way, I tried the battery on my mower for the first time since it fixed itself and it worked fine.
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Paul Christenson

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<You may try tapping the battery with a rubber mallet or something heavy but rubbery so as not to shock the battery too hard.>

This is known as JES...:)
Justifiable Equipment Slapping as explained to me by a Honeywell Field Engineer, when he dropped a Honeywell Keyboard to shake a microswitch open so the terminal keyboard would operate again...:)

The downside to these type of solutions is that the users were still doing it because the mainframe was extremely slow...AND all of the keyboards had had their defective microswitches replaced...:)
(Edited)