A Lot of Uncut Blades of Grass

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I love the mower, and convinced my brother in law to buy one too.  We both are experiencing issues where we have a lot of uncut blades of grass after mulching.  We have slowed our pace and overlapped our paths far more than what we should have to.  The cutting height is the highest, but we need to keep it that way.  My BIL is returning his mower due to this, and I am contemplating doing the same.  We spend too much money and time on our yards. to have so many missed blades that stand back up.

Is this a known issue and are there any solutions?
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Justin Kelso

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Posted 5 years ago

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SCDC, Champion

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Ok, I've seen a lot of people complain about this, and I have also experienced this issue.  You can increase the curve on the blade a tad to create a tad more updraft, which should pull at the grass and also circulate the cut blades of grass a little better.  The blade does not have much lift.  I had to do quite a bit of modifying to get a good mulch.  I'm finding issues with damp grass clumping though.  I think it is the design of the deck and the curvature.  As the blades of grass rotate around and get mulched, they clump together until they are heavy enough to fall to the ground.  Kind of odd really, because the lack of lift causes the problem with uncut blades, and yet the lift causes the clumping.  Looks like a design problem, but I'm ok with it, as my yard isn't very dense, so my cut is very good.
(Edited)
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Keith

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I am experiencing uncut blades of grass also
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SCDC, Champion

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Keith, and others like you.  Could you please post the type of grass you have and the cutting height?  (Fescue, Rye, etc.).  This would be quite helpful.

Kind Regards.

(Edited)
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Daryl

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I think the blade is the weakest part of the product design. I notice there is not a lot of updraft also. I get cedar needles in my lawn and my old lawnmower which had a blade designed  just for Mulching. It  was able to suck up the needles and mulch them. My new lawnmower does not have the ability to do that, which I think is due to the blade being a "combination" blade. Please EGO have your engineers design a dedicated mulching blade. Other then that I really prefer my EGO over my old lawn mower.
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Keith

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This is keith again. I have St augustine grass and I cut it at the highest level (5).

Thank you.
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SCDC, Champion

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Hi Keith, 5" is very popular for cool weather grasses.  I didn't know St. Augustine liked a high cut.  Thanks for the info.  Now, 5" off of the ground could be a problem if the blade doesn't produce much life, the grass will kind of "float" around and you may get uncut blades.  I can see where a blade with more lift would really help.  I cut at 3" but wish I had 2 1/2.  So lift isn't as much of an issue.  Good information to share, thank you!
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Keith

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Thanks for the information SCDC Champion. I will try reducing the cut down first to 4 then 3 y see if it helps.

Keith
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SCDC, Champion

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Hey Keith, check this out.  Seems you will be good cutting at 3".  http://www.walterreeves.com/lawn-care/st-augustine-mowing/

Hope you have a great weekend and good luck.  Please keep us informed if the lower height helps much.

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SCDC, Champion

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While we are on the subject.  I have a mix of centipede and Bermuda.  We had about 2" of rain last night and I cut the grass today at 3" height.  The grass was overgrown to over 5" and thick.  I had no clumps of grass or bogging down of the mower.  Here is some pics to show you a few things.

Blade, should be razor sharp, from the tip to where the blade ends.

Here is my lawn after cut, and what the mower was like after the cut.  Yep, that grass was wet!  This mower never stalled, or even bogged down.

Yes, it had pretty much a yard full of clippings stuck to it, but better it than my lawn  :)

For those wondering why those of us with warm weather grass want an edger, It is a war to try and "edge" with a string trimmer.  These "talons" of Centipede grass are one tough weed to cut.  I laid a few out, just so you can see how it grows. 

Thanks for looking.  It's sometimes good to share some pictures so others can realize if they have a problem, or what they are experiencing is normal.

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Jacob

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I agree. The blade needs to be razor sharp.
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Adam Mickiewicz

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What I am reading in this thread regarding cutting height has me wondering if there is a misprint in the manual.

According to page 17 of the mower manual pdf, the 5 cutting heights range from setting 1 at 1.2" to setting 5 at 3.5". Simple math would put the 5 settings at:
1 = 1.2"
2 = 1.775"
3 = 2.35"
4 = 2.925"
5 = 3.5"

Yet, in the exchange between Keith and SCDC, Keith mentions setting 5, while SCDC in his reply interprets setting 5 as 5". Later SCDC comments he wishes he had a 2.5" option, which at setting three according to the manual would be at 2.35", approximately. That's pretty close to 2.5"!
So my question is, without having my mower beside me to physically check, which scale is correct?

Thanks in advance.

(Edited)
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SCDC, Champion

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Now you have me utterly confused.  Time to take my tape measure and answer this question.  Will measure from blade cutting surface to ground. 
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Adam Mickiewicz

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I wouldn't be surprised either way, setting 5 visually appears to tower over the lawn.
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SCDC, Champion

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It's mainly because how far out the wheels are from the deck, it is a mind trick of the eyes.  All of that open space makes it appear well over 3 1/2".  But the cutting blade is dead on 3 1/2" at setting 5.   :)   Very glad you posted this.
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SCDC, Champion

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Well all, the Manual is correct.  Measured it myself.  We can all eat our own grass clippings.  The blade sits exactly 1/4" from the bottom of the deck and I checked the measurements with each setting myself.  One would assume it was 1" to 5".  We were all wrong for assuming.  How funny is that.  I gave ADAM a big LIKE for actually reading the manual!  FYI, the setting of 3 has been GREAT for me all summer.
(Edited)
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Adam Mickiewicz

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Cool, thanks for the clarification.

I visited the thread because I too am experiencing spots of grass that go untouched as I pass over, this at setting 4. It is rainy season here which means rain every other day or so, moderate amounts punctuated by a downpour, with daily highs in the nineties Fahrenheit. The sprinklers run 30 minutes per pre-dawn day when the weather is not rain.

The Kentucky bluegrass mix is thick, green, and growing like a weed. I am mowing it on a 5 or so day cycle, and catching it as there is too much new growth between cuttings for mulching at this time. That and the grass is a little damp.

The mower and thus blade are less than a month old. I presume the blade to have shipped in sharpened condition. This is supported by observation that the cut grass is a clean cut, it does not appear to have been beaten into submission by a dull blade. I walk slowly behind the mower, careful that the chassis and blade do not bounce over spots. I also overlap passes by a few inches to account for the boundary gap between wheels and blade edge. My yard is on level and even ground. No high or low obstacles to traverse.

As I return from each pass, I can see the unscathed blades of grass waving at me in the breeze. They bend a bit as they are taller. Not 12 inches tall, but taller than their freshly cut peers. Does it stand to reason that the grass, growing overly long between cuts is bending under it's own weight, combined with the weak updraft from the mower, then being passed over by the blade?

Thoughts or ideas are appreciated!
(Edited)
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Matt

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you can also try have a 30 deg angle put on your blade by a profeesional. most commercial mowers use this angle. but beware it uses mower power and the blade will need to be sharpened more often but the benifit it well worth it.
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888 Sharp

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While surfing I "stumbled" across this site. There's just way too much unsubstantiated non-scientific info on the internet.

We have been sharpening lawn mower blades for over a half century and have a lot of knowledge to contribute regarding the topics of mowing, sharpening, and turf grass.

You can Google and find many University studies which have the scientific proof that corroborates what will be said here as well as thought to be true for decades, and will put to rest the myths that abound.

A lawn mower blade needs "lift" as this is what keeps cut-off grass clippings airborne so they can be stuck again and again to reduce clipping size ever so important with mulching mowers/decks.

Each year our shop finds more and more brand new lawn mower blades out of balance 80% 2013, 85% 2014). Chinese blades have not been very good. And it matters not the brand. Mexican blades were better than Chinese in 2013 and again in 2014.

A MYTH was mentioned on your forum regarding lawn mower blade sharpness - - 
Lawn mower blades should NEVER be sharpened to a "razor blade" sharpness as this produces an extremely and structurally weak edge. Razor sharp edges will wear faster as they are a weak edge, instead slightly less than razor sharp is ideal - a little sharper than a butter knike maybe but not much more.

Going back to Loft (aka "Lift"), the blade's design creates this. Some blades use the back edge (think "up swept wing") to cause this effect while others use a combination of cutting edge "waviness" along with the wavy/up swept back edge to create lift.  Gator blades are designed to reduce bulk (think leaves, pine cones, nuts) so the particulate matter being dispersed (out the chute) or bagged is much smaller for obvious reasons.

Mower blade RPM is important as this RPM creates lift in conjunction with the mounted blade.

Do NOT CUT WET GRASS. It will dull your mower blade faster than dry grass. It will cake on the underside of your mower deck and cause corrosion/rust/ If left on your mower blades this wet vegetation will severely rust your blades. Continually doing this or left on blades over the winter creates far worse rust than simple surface rust - it deeply rusts the blade's steel and leaves a pock mark type surface. Pock marked sufraces are NOT smooth. This hampers air flow, disrupts tha pattern, reduces loft - - and shortens the life of yopur blade.

Grass stuck to the underside of a mower deck also disrupts air flow with the same results mentioned above.

So what are the better (best?) things you can do -
Stop treating your lawn mower like a rake or snow shovel as it is far more sophisticated and needs proper maintenance.

Keep it tuned up so it starts right away.
Use fresh gasoline. Add Star-Tron or Stabil to over-winter gasoline in the mower's tank as well as run your mower with this mixture so it gets into your carb.
Clean your deck if you HAVE NO CHOICE but to mow wet grass. Tilt deck carb side up. Wash with a hose - BUT - do NOT force water into the bearing/crankshaft/spindle seals as water pressure does force water into the seals with NO WAY for the water to drip out - so it sits inside the bearings promoting rust.
Keep mower blades clean, sharp, and rust free.
Do NOT balance blades on a nail; Cones are quite poor as well.
Blades need to come off the mower to be inspected, cleaned, sharpened, balanced and returned to service.
Dremel sharpeners are a toy.
Right angle grinders are the wrong tool.
Bench grinders need to have a jig made so the edge is cut at the correct angle and is consistent.

I know a lot will dispute what i have written. Provide University Studies to back up your claims of "good enough", "worked for me", etc. The intent of what I took the time to write here is not to rain on one's parade, but to merely point out better, scientifically proven methods/reasons for doing something better.

Glad the warm weather is finally here! Enjoy your season.
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icrooks

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I have the problem with uncut grass described above. I don't know what type of grass it is but it's very fine and it doesn't get cut when it's over about six inches, just gets bent over. It's ironic that the mower has enough power to cut through heavy, stiff grass but fails in the thin stuff.

I bought this mower because I'm trying to go green and the specs on this one imply that it'll outperform the competition but my stepfather's old sears 20V with a lead-acid battery kicks thus one's butt (except for the 12hr recharge time, of course). It's very disappointing to spend extra $$ only to have mediocre performance.   
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Daryl

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I have a slightly different problem, in that this lawn mower doesn't suck up cedar needles in the fall. Like you I had a 20 volt steel deck lawnmower, that blows this lawnmower away when it comes to suction. But because of the ridiculous charging time, poor customer service and short battery life, I decided to by the EGO. 

 I am wondering if the poor suction has more to do with having a plastic housing around the blade rather then a steel housing and/or the blade is a combination regular cutting and mulching blade. I have asked EGO if they are going to come out with a dedicated mulching blade, but have been told that is not going to happen at this time.

I have also heard that steel blades that are made in China are made from steel of a lower quality then blades manufactured in North America, which I think contributes to the problem.

But having said that, I really like this lawnmower for spring and summer grass cutting, customer service is excellent.

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Madness

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I have similar issues with this, mostly with the grass that the wheels have gone over (it doesn't bounce back up, so a better lift is needed). Has anyone designed a better blade? I've got the self propelled version - 21". Is there a firmware update (lol) - someone once called this the Tesla of mowers.
(Edited)
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szwoopp, Champion

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Currently on back order but some have found this blade to help with cut quality and lift.

https://www.amazon.com/EGO-Power-AB2101-LM2100SP-LM2102SP/dp/B01N39KRRM

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