A little advice on my 7.5ah battery not working, seems to be dripping something clear-ish

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  • Updated 3 years ago
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I charged my new 7.5ah battery that came with my mower today.  I came home and it won't light up.  There was some clear liquid under it.  I put on some rubber gloves and cleaned my floor, then put on a pan for safety.  Is this ok?  Do I just need to let it sit?  It wasn't warm. 

I'm by no means educated well enough in how these batteries are constructed to make any sort of decision.  

I've never had an issue with a battery in 3 years, so this is a first.
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  • Hmmm

Posted 3 years ago

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SCDC, Champion

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And you wonder why I want you and Dave to move close to me. I'll build the garage, supply the drinks, you bring the ingenuity.
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SCDC, Champion

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My God EGO has the best customer service I have EVER experienced.  I dropped the Battery off at Home Depot to be properly recycled (Per EGO's request) and they are sending me a replacement.  24 hour turn around, American representatives (no India call center), and the best support community in the industry.  EGO's on a roll here.  

And some wonder why we are so gun-ho about our EGO products.  Thank you.  If Consumer Reports ever did a customer service satisfaction survey, EGO would easily claim another win.
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David Cline

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The high quality makes it easy to forget that this is basically the same lithium cell technology that has been blowing up all those hands-free gyroscope scooters (oft-mislabeled "hoverboards") when improperly engineered.

Ego has done such a great job engineering these batteries. They can easily be popped in and out of the tools and chargers, rapidly discharging and recharging flawlessly. Too bad they're considered dangerous because of sloppy engineering by other companies!
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Li-Ion cells sure have gotten a black eye reputation thanks to cheap suppliers and abysmal quality control. Thankfully there are high quality suppliers which keep the higher end company's products operating as intended.
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TheAtomTwister

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Dude, I would have taken it apart and salvaged the cells and found out where the problem was, but that's because I'm TheAtomTwister, and I'll take apart anything if I have enough of a reason to, and getting up to 52 2.5Ah cells would be enough of a reason for me to take that big monster apart.
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Blue Angel, Champion

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For the average person who is not knowledgeable and comfortable handling live electric circuits, dismantling a high voltage battery is not recommended. There are many things that can go wrong that could leave someone with a bad burn, or worse, an uncontrollable fire. Most people, even those who know a little about electricity, have very little appreciation for how much energy is stored in these things.

There's a lot of safety Engineered into these Ego packs, but that all goes away the minute you start taking them apart. I love to tinker as much or more than the next guy, but I'm always careful what I convince people to play with. ;-)

I would advise people to follow Ego's direction and have the packs recycled. There are lots of valuable materials in these cells that will not go to waste.
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TheAtomTwister

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I'm glad you said that, deter those who don't know what they're doing from taking these apart because of me suggesting that's what I would do. I've tapped two wires that I stuck into the terminals of one of these things and the spark was blindingly bright. That WILL start a fire.  So to anyone with any ideas about taking apart EGO packs, or, even more importantly, any high voltage pack, especially 80V packs, don't do it unless you know what you're doing with electricity, and do not do it around flammable objects.