20” Mower Internal Fuse from battery pack case to mower internals?

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Hi Guys,

Anyone know where I can find the inline mower fuse (or better yet a fuse holder and correctly sized fuse) for the red wire that runs from the battery pack to the internals?

I don’t have the luxury of a warranty since both the mower and battery were bought through ebay. I found out that wonderful fact AFTER I paid $400-$500 total for both and was forced to buy a new battery after less than a year, even though both the mower and battery were brand new when purchased. When the problem developed w/ the motor not starting, I was forced to go looking for the problem myself. Checked the inline fuse, and it had blown. Of course, rather than a simple fuse holder, apparently the ego mower needs a completely new wire - since the fuse that is run between the battery pack and wherever it goes in the internals is soldered directly to the wire. I don’t know a ton about electronics, but that seems like a pretty dumb idea to me. A simple fuse holder that twists together seems like a much simpler and better solution. Besides, supplying a simple serial number to each item and requiring people to register their products w/ proof of purchase seems like a much more valid way to deny invalid warranty claims. Seriously, if I have to go buy another mower because a fuse get’s blown (and taking apart the mower is a royal PITA), how likely do you think I’d be to recommend eGo’s products to my neighbors or purchase anything else from eGO? Stuff like this and the ridiculous amout of time it takes to find replacement parts is beyond frustrating. It’s a mower for cryin out loud, not the SR-71 Blackbird...every major manufacturer offers electric yard tools. You guys should have the wiring diagrams online, replacement parts available for purchase, etc. This is all beyond frustrating...
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Jeff Lever

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Posted 4 weeks ago

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Paul Christenson

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Watch the EGO battery videos from Thrifty Tool Shed
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hY0HALIDfnw&frags=pl%2Cwn&ab_channel=ThriftyToolShed

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qW4c1HQv0xA&frags=pl%2Cwn&ab_channel=ThriftyToolShed

Conversation related to 2nd video seems to relate to you...

michael charach
michael charach4 months ago

Hi,. I have a dead 56v battery.. the indicator lights up green, however no voltage when I test it. I took it apart and all of the cells appear to be fine. It look like the surface mount fuse on the small battery connection board by the terminals is blown. When I short out the fuse I have voltage at the terminals again. Is it possible that my problem is the fuse? if so what do I need to order, and how do I get it off of the board??


Thrifty Tool Shed
Thrifty Tool Shed4 months ago

michael charach , That could be, I had one similar that had a bad connection instead that I mentioned in my repair update video. I was able to fix mine because the fuse was ok just bad connection to the solder pads. I have never seen a fuse like it before. You could possibly have more luck finding a flat Pak style fuse, but I have not had to yet. That's one great thing about buying some bad batteries from eBay etc. You end up with donor parts from some to fix others also!



Jacob Corder

you have a blown fuse inside of the battery. i have created a solder bridge in one of mine. it was hard to get the solder to stick, but so far so good. just use a soldering iron and basically create a connection using a solder pool. not the best idea but it does work..


michael charach

I could not get the solder to stick, it just kept rolling off.


Jacob Corder
michael charach mine did also It took a lot of tries. Start from both ends, then work towards the center


Thrifty Tool Shed
michael charach, Try to clean area really well with alcohol and use rosin flux( RA flux). It will help sometimes!






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Jeff Lever

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Unfortunately, my fuse problem isn't within the battery itself...it's within the mower itself. On the back of the battery housing w/ the green lid, when you remove it, there are 3 wires on the back - red, blue, and black. The red line looks like it has what looks like a 30A 250V fuse actually soldered inline. The exterior of it looks like it might be ceramic rather than glass, but it's a standard fast-acting fuse from what I can tell after cracking the fuse open to make sure it was actually a fuse. Pretty stout fuse to handle 30Amp @ 240v. I can provide a picture if need be. 
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Jeff Lever

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I found it the exact same fuse on amazon. Here's what I was referring to (in case anyone can't get warranty service)

Pack of 5, 6x30mm (1/4 inch x 1-1/4 inch), 30A 250v Fuses Ceramic Fast Blow (Quick Blow/Fast Acting), 6x30mm, ABC 30A F30A 30 amp (Standard Fuse - Requires Holder)

At least I learned something new from all this. The type of fuse used inline on the red power cord in the ego 20" mower is called an axial fuse. Didn't actually realize they existed, but they're fuses that come w/ wire leads attached to the cap meant to be soldered permanently in place. If you want to go with something as close to OEM, then you'd be looking for an axial 30amp 250v inline fuse, like this one:

eGo OEM-like Axial Fuse Replacement

Edit: Ok...so instead of either fuse, decided to go with inline circuit breaker since it cost pretty much the same as the fuses and I could just add some quick connectors to the old fuse wire and use that. I'll report back if it ends up blowing up the battery or motor, lol. Otherwise, I assume it'd be just as good as a 30a 250v fuse. Went with this waterproof one so I can drill a small hole in the mower housing and reset it without having to take the freakin thing apart (like if the fuse blows again). Here's the one I got:

30amp 250v inline circuit breaker for eGo fuse replacement




(Edited)
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Paul Christenson

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Unless you are a victim of Murphy's Law of Electronics...
  • The most expensive circuit will be the first to blow.
  • 1st Corollary: An expensive circuit protected by a fuse will protect the fuse by blowing first.
The difference between fuses and breakers...
Fuses protect electronics, sensitive equipment, because they blow faster than breakers. Breakers are designed to protect wiring circuits, motors, and other more rugged electronics as they blow more slowly.
(Edited)