16" chainsaw seems to be shutting itself down when cutting anything larger than 4".

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  • Updated 3 years ago
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16" chainsaw seems to be shutting itself down when cutting anything larger than 4". I really like this saw, but I don't understand why it keeps turning off. I only use it in short bursts... It's not hitting the chain guard, and it's not being used that much consecutively to over heat it...  Is it defective?

I've read through the entire manual and I don't see anything about an automatic shut down.  I've also cleaned out the bar area and it still does it. 
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Jared

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Posted 3 years ago

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Blue Angel, Champion

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Official Response
Jared, it sounds like that may be the case. I have not used the Ego chainsaw but from all the reviews I have seen, it is quite a powerful unit that shouldn't even blink cutting a 5" branch. This is, of course, assuming the chain is sharp and getting proper lubrication, the slack is properly adjusted, and the bar is in good condition with no abnormal wear.

If you've verified all the above, I would give Customer Service a call and see what they have to say. If there is another issue with your saw they can help you troubleshoot it.
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Dave .

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I have the 14" version.  While I can cut a stump that is more than 10", if I cut vertically through the stump, it stalls constantly.  Something about the grain of the wood. VERY ANNOYING, to be sure.  They seem to have  sensitive overload sensor in these units.
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That's the difference between cross-cutting and ripping. Ripping is almost always tougher on a saw than cross-cutting is.

Unless there's something else going on that I'm not considering? As Jacob mentions below, the saw will cut better with a larger battery as well... ripping with a 2Ah battery will probably take a lot more patience than cross-cutting with a larger battery.
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Jared

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I took BlueAngel's advice and spoke with Ego's customer service.  Apparently, there was a defective run in production that results in the motor cutting off at random times.  They are mailing me a new saw and I will send the old one back. 

Aside from this, I found the saw to be VERY powerful and an excellent alternative to getting a Stihl or comparable gas powered saw. 
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Sweet! Glad to hear they got you looked after, Jared!
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Jacob

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What battery are you using. 2ah has much less power than the 5
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Dave .

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Today I had to switch to the only large battery I have, the 7.5, as the CS kept stopping every few seconds even with a brand new chain.  using the 7.5 battery, I was able to make a number of full length cuts with the CS NEVER stalling.  NOW, I have to run to HD to get a 5/32" CS chain file because the new chain is already dulled.   Sigh.  Perhaps I shouldn't have bought this thing and just sucked it up and rented a gas powered CS to get an 18" stump whittled down.  The Ego CS did fine felling the roughly 11" tree, but the stump is "stumping" this electric CS.
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Jacob

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The chain is just an oregon chain. Nothing different between that and another chain. Driven by gas or battery you would have the same results i think. Anyways, why are you ripping the stump? You need a special blade to rip dont you?
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Dave .

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I'm just trying to lower the stump so that it doesn't protrude above ground.  It's next to a fence and I've dug  around the stump in all directions.  I can't quite lop off the stump by holding the cs parallel to the ground to remove the entire stump so I'm cutting it out in sections.
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Dave .

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You are obsessed with the term "ripping".    When one fells a tree, what's the first thing to do?  You cut a notch in the tree, right?  The downward cut is  pretty much what I'm doing on the stump, as I remove pieces.  I'm not "ripping" a piece of lumber, as I'd be doing in my shop, using my Unisaw or bandsaw.   Sigh...
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Jacob

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I thought you were cutting it into boards. Or didnt have a log splitter. Sigh...
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Jacob

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I am scared to ask because your responses are always so nice, did any dirt hit the blade as it was under ground slightly?
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Dave .

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I was careful not to hit any but I can't swear to it as I know what happens when you hit rocks, dirt, etc.  I really should have opted to have rented a really large, powerful CS to tackle this job--I got the Ego CS for much less robust cutting, for which it works like a charm.  This type of cutting is obviously not it's forte--the wood is dense, in an awkward spot to reach from the back side, and the diameter is greater than 14" so that it's nigh impossible to make a cut from the front, then finish the cut from the fence side.  A larger CS could cut the whole thing down from the front side with one pass.
(Edited)